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How can programmes better support female sex workers to avoid HIV infection in Zimbabwe? A prevention cascade analysis

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Fearon, Elizabeth, Phillips, Andrew, Mtetwa, Sibongle, Chabata, Sungai T, Mushati, Phillis, Cambiano, Valentina, Busza, Joanna, Napierala, Sue, Hensen, Bernadette, Baral, Stefan, Weir, Sharon S, Rice, Brian, Cowan, Frances ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-3087-4422 and Hargreaves, James R (2019) 'How can programmes better support female sex workers to avoid HIV infection in Zimbabwe? A prevention cascade analysis'. JAIDS: Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes, Vol 81, Issue 1, pp. 24-35.

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Abstract

Background
‘HIV prevention cascades’ have been proposed to support programmes by identifying gaps in demand for, access to and capability to adhere to HIV prevention tools, but there are few empirical examples to guide development. We apply a prevention cascade framework to examine prevention coverage and factors associated with condoms and/or PrEP adherence among female sex workers (FSW).
Setting
Seven sites across Zimbabwe.
Methods
Seven respondent-driven sampling (RDS) surveys from the intervention sites of a pragmatic cluster-randomised trial in Zimbabwe in 2016 were analysed, and 611/1439 women testing HIV-negative included. We operationalised key components of an HIV prevention cascade including demand, supply and capability to adhere to two tools for HIV prevention: condoms and Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP). We used adjusted logistic regression to identify determinants of adherence to condoms and PrEP in turn, examining the effect of adherence to one tool on adherence to the other.
Results
There were 343/611, 54.7%, women reporting adherence to condoms and/or PrEP, leaving almost half uncovered. While women were aware that condoms prevented HIV and reported good access to them, only 45·5% reported full adherence to condom use. For PrEP, a new technology, there were gaps along all three domains of demand, supply and adherence. Alcohol use decreased adherence to PrEP and condoms. Younger and newer entrants to sex work were less likely to take PrEP every day.
Conclusion
HIV prevention programming among FSW in Zimbabwe could consider increasing awareness of PrEP alongside supply, alcohol use interventions, and approaches to engaging younger women.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: W General Medicine. Health Professions > W 26.5 Informatics. Health informatics
WA Public Health > Health Problems of Special Population Groups > WA 309 Women's health
WA Public Health > Health Problems of Special Population Groups > WA 395 Health in developing countries
WC Communicable Diseases > Virus Diseases > Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome. HIV Infections > WC 503 Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. HIV infections
WC Communicable Diseases > Virus Diseases > Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome. HIV Infections > WC 503.6 Prevention and control
Faculty: Department: Clinical Sciences & International Health > International Public Health Department
Digital Object Identifer (DOI): https://doi.org/10.1097/QAI.0000000000001980
Depositing User: Stacy Murtagh
Date Deposited: 18 Feb 2019 09:43
Last Modified: 11 Apr 2019 09:47
URI: http://archive.lstmed.ac.uk/id/eprint/10030

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