LSTM Home > LSTM Research > LSTM Online Archive

A systematic review with epidemiological update of male genital schistosomiasis (MGS): A call for integrated case management across the health system in sub-Saharan Africa.

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year

Kayuni, Seke, Lampiao, Fanuel, Makaula, Peter, Juziwelo, Lazarus, LaCourse, James ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-9261-7136, Reinhard-Rupp, Jutta, Leutscher, Peter D C and Stothard, Russell ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-9370-3420 (2019) 'A systematic review with epidemiological update of male genital schistosomiasis (MGS): A call for integrated case management across the health system in sub-Saharan Africa.'. Parasite Epidemiology and Control, Vol 4, e00077.

[img] Text
MGS_revised_clean.doc - Accepted Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.

Download (1MB)

Abstract

Male genital schistosomiasis (MGS) is a gender specific manifestation of urogenital schistosomiasis (UGS) first described in 1911 by Madden in Egypt. Today, while affecting millions of men and boys worldwide, MGS receives insufficient attention, especially in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). To provide a systematic review with an epidemiological update of MGS, we inspected both online and hardcopy resources in our appraisal. A total of 147 articles were eventually identified, only 31 articles were exclusively focused on MGS with original or targeted research. From these, we discuss pertinent clinico-pathological features of MGS, highlight the possible connection and interplay with HIV, and assess current diagnostic techniques alongside consideration of their use and application in SSA. To appreciate the burden of MGS more fully, especially in endemic areas, there is a clear need for better surveillance and longitudinal population research to investigate the best point-of-care (POC) diagnostic and its performance through time. Furthermore, to optimise individual case management, exploration of alternative praziquantel dosing regimens is needed for MGS in men with or without HIV co-infection.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: WA Public Health > WA 30 Socioeconomic factors in public health (General)
WA Public Health > Health Problems of Special Population Groups > WA 395 Health in developing countries
WC Communicable Diseases > Tropical and Parasitic Diseases > WC 680 Tropical diseases (General)
WC Communicable Diseases > Tropical and Parasitic Diseases > WC 810 Schistosomiasis
WJ Urogenital System > WJ 20 Research (General)
Faculty: Department: Biological Sciences > Vector Biology Department
Education
Digital Object Identifer (DOI): https://doi.org/10.1016/j.parepi.2018.e00077
Depositing User: Stacy Murtagh
Date Deposited: 04 Feb 2019 18:35
Last Modified: 20 Jun 2019 14:53
URI: https://archive.lstmed.ac.uk/id/eprint/10104

Statistics

View details

Actions (login required)

Edit Item Edit Item