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Research into the Causes of Venom-Induced Mortality and Morbidity Identifies New Therapeutic Opportunities.

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Girish, Kesturu S, Katkar, Gajanan D, Harrison, Robert and Kemparaju, Kempaiah (2019) 'Research into the Causes of Venom-Induced Mortality and Morbidity Identifies New Therapeutic Opportunities.'. The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, Vol 100, Issue 5, pp. 1043-1048.

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Abstract

Snakebite primarily affects rural subsistent farming populations in underdeveloped and developing nations. The annual number of deaths (100,000) and physical disabilities (400,000) of snakebite victims is a societal tragedy that poses a significant added socioeconomic burden to the society. Antivenom therapy is the treatment of choice for snakebite but, as testified by the continuing high rates of mortality and morbidity, too many rural tropical snakebite victims fail to access effective treatment. Here, we advocate for more basic research to better understand the pathogenesis of systemic and local envenoming and describe how research outcomes can identify novel snakebite therapeutic strategies with the potential to be more accessible and affordable to victims than current treatment.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: QW Microbiology and Immunology > Antigens and Antibodies. Toxins and Antitoxins > QW 630 Toxins. Antitoxins
WD Disorders of Systemic, Metabolic or Environmental Origin, etc > Animal Poisons > WD 400 General works
WD Disorders of Systemic, Metabolic or Environmental Origin, etc > Animal Poisons > WD 410 Reptiles
Faculty: Department: Biological Sciences > Department of Tropical Disease Biology
Digital Object Identifer (DOI): https://doi.org/10.4269/ajtmh.17-0877
Depositing User: Stacy Murtagh
Date Deposited: 01 Jul 2019 13:44
Last Modified: 01 Jul 2019 13:44
URI: https://archive.lstmed.ac.uk/id/eprint/11119

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