LSTM Home > LSTM Research > LSTM Online Archive

Exploring the Association Between Mobility and Access to HIV Services Among Female Sex Workers in Zimbabwe.

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year

Davey, Calum, Dirawo, Jeffrey, Hargreaves, James R and Cowan, Frances ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-3087-4422 (2019) 'Exploring the Association Between Mobility and Access to HIV Services Among Female Sex Workers in Zimbabwe.'. AIDS and Behavior. (In Press)

[img] Text
Revised_manuscript-10June2019.docx - Accepted Version
Restricted to Repository staff only until 29 June 2020.

Download (38kB)
[img] Text
Tables-10June2019-PDF.pdf - Supplemental Material
Restricted to Repository staff only until 29 June 2020.

Download (238kB)
[img] Text
Figures-10June2019.pdf - Supplemental Material
Restricted to Repository staff only until 29 June 2020.

Download (182kB)
[img] Text
Appendices_10_June_2019.pdf - Supplemental Material
Restricted to Repository staff only until 29 June 2020.

Download (87kB)

Abstract

Female sex workers (FSW) face structural barriers to HIV-service access, however the effect of their mobility is uncertain. Using cross-sectional data from 2839 FSW in 14 sites in Zimbabwe, we explored the association between mobility (number of trips, distance, duration) in the past 12 months and five HIV-service-access outcomes: exposure to community mobilisation, clinic attendance, HIV testing, antiretroviral treatment initiation, and viral suppression (< 1000 copies per mL). We used modified-Poisson regression, and natural-effects models to estimate how the effect of trip frequency was mediated by distance and duration away. Each additional trip in 12 months was associated with increased community-mobilisation-event attendance (adjusted RR 1.08, 95% CI 1.04-1.12) and attending clinic two-or-more times (adjusted RR 1.02, 95% CI 1.00-1.05). There was little evidence of any other associations, or of mediation. Our findings are consistent with literature that found the effects of mobility to vary by context and outcome. This is the first study to consider many FSW-mobility and HIV-service-access measures together. Future research on mobility and health-related behaviour should use a spectrum of measures.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: W General Medicine. Health Professions > Health Services. Patients and Patient Advocacy > W 84 Health services. Delivery of health care
WA Public Health > Health Problems of Special Population Groups > WA 309 Women's health
WC Communicable Diseases > Virus Diseases > Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome. HIV Infections > WC 503 Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. HIV infections
WP Gynecology > WP 100 General works
Faculty: Department: Clinical Sciences & International Health > International Public Health Department
Digital Object Identifer (DOI): https://doi.org/10.1007/s10461-019-02559-9
Depositing User: Stacy Murtagh
Date Deposited: 02 Jul 2019 08:38
Last Modified: 01 Aug 2019 12:44
URI: https://archive.lstmed.ac.uk/id/eprint/11139

Statistics

View details

Actions (login required)

Edit Item Edit Item