LSTM Home > LSTM Research > LSTM Online Archive

A Formative Qualitative Study on the Acceptability of Deferred Consent in Adult Emergency Care Research in Malawi

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year

Manda-Taylor, Lucinda, Bickton, Fanuel Meckson, Gooding, Kate ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-4926-0287 and Rylance, Jamie ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-2323-3611 (2019) 'A Formative Qualitative Study on the Acceptability of Deferred Consent in Adult Emergency Care Research in Malawi'. Journal of Empirical Research on Human Research Ethics: An International Journal, Vol 14, Issue 4, pp. 318-327.

[img] Text
Deferred Consent Manuscript Main DocumentReviewer Revision May 2019_Final Accepted.docx - Accepted Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.

Download (42kB)

Abstract

Research in emergency medical care is challenging due to a limited therapeutic window for intervention, which may compromise informed consent. “Deferred consent” allows initiation of study procedures before full consent is recorded. We conducted a formative qualitative study exploring perspectives on deferred consent in Malawi among research ethics committee members, health care professionals, and lay representatives. Participants identified several advantages of deferred consent including scientific value and potential health benefits to the study subjects and wider population. Participants also had concerns, including regulatory barriers and the risk of abuse and malpractice. Conditions affecting acceptability are related to the role of proxies, the nature of the research, the availability of robust regulatory oversight, and the need for community engagement. Our findings show deferred consent would be acceptable in Malawi, provided that a clear case can be made to advance medical knowledge and that adequate regulatory and ethical protections are in place.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: W General Medicine. Health Professions > Health Services. Patients and Patient Advocacy > W 85 Patients. Attitude and compliance
WA Public Health > Health Problems of Special Population Groups > WA 395 Health in developing countries
WB Practice of Medicine > WB 105 Emergency medicine. Medical emergencies
WX Hospitals and Other Health Facilities > Clinical Departments and Units > WX 215 Emergency service. Ambulance service
Faculty: Department: Clinical Sciences & International Health > International Public Health Department
Digital Object Identifer (DOI): https://doi.org/10.1177/1556264619865149
Depositing User: Stacy Murtagh
Date Deposited: 12 Aug 2019 08:22
Last Modified: 13 Mar 2020 16:19
URI: https://archive.lstmed.ac.uk/id/eprint/11420

Statistics

View details

Actions (login required)

Edit Item Edit Item