LSTM Home > LSTM Research > LSTM Online Archive

Collaborations on blood transfusion research in sub‐Saharan Africa: who, what and where

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year

Fisher, Amelia, Wallis, Selina, Hassall, Oliver, Martin, Russell and Bates, Imelda ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-0862-8199 (2020) 'Collaborations on blood transfusion research in sub‐Saharan Africa: who, what and where'. Vox Sanguinis, Vol 115, Issue 3, pp. 221-232.

[img] Text
Collaborations on blood transfusion research in Africa who what and where rev 10dec19 clean.docx - Accepted Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.

Download (89kB)

Abstract

Background and Objectives
Children and pregnant women use 75% of the blood supply in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) but face widespread blood shortages. To increase safe blood supply, Africa-specific evidence and strengthened capacity for transfusion research are needed. Our study analysed seven years of SSA transfusion publications, compared researched topics against priorities, and enumerated SSA transfusion research collaborations.
Materials and Methods
Data on research topic, journal type, authors’ institutions and country were extracted from transfusion-related SSA articles published between 2008-14 and used to construct a quantitative, graphic visualisation of collaborations. Research topics were compared to those identified as priorities for SSA blood services in 2008 and 2015.
Results
267/2176 articles (average 38/year) met criteria for analysis. They involved 1245 authors, 673 institutions, 59 countries (35 SSA) and 1375 collaborations. 41% were on transfusion-transmitted infections. 34% were published in specialist transfusion journals. Only 7% involved exclusively collaborations within SSA. Two of the top fifteen institutions by publication quantity, were from outside SSA.
Conclusion
Despite a general paucity of SSA-relevant transfusion research, Francophone SSA was well-represented. Published research topics are not well-matched to SSA research priorities; research on supply, distribution, financing and systems is particularly neglected. The study provides a baseline against which to track any re-focusing of research activity to better meet SSA’s needs. Transfusion research hubs within and beyond SSA have been identified as a springboard network for expanding SSA transfusion research capacity.

KEYWORDS
Sub-Saharan Africa, blood transfusion, research, collaborations

Item Type: Article
Subjects: WA Public Health > Health Problems of Special Population Groups > WA 395 Health in developing countries
WA Public Health > Statistics. Surveys > WA 950 Theory or methods of medical statistics. Epidemiologic methods
WB Practice of Medicine > Therapeutics > WB 356 Blood transfusion
Faculty: Department: Clinical Sciences & International Health > International Public Health Department
Digital Object Identifer (DOI): https://doi.org/10.1111/vox.12884
Depositing User: Rachel Dominguez
Date Deposited: 06 Feb 2020 13:27
Last Modified: 24 Apr 2020 14:37
URI: https://archive.lstmed.ac.uk/id/eprint/13324

Statistics

View details

Actions (login required)

Edit Item Edit Item