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An update on non-invasive urine diagnostics for human-infecting parasitic helminths: what more could be done and how?

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Archer, John, LaCourse, James ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-9261-7136, Webster, L. Bonnie and Stothard, Russell ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-9370-3420 (2020) 'An update on non-invasive urine diagnostics for human-infecting parasitic helminths: what more could be done and how?'. Parasitology, Vol 147, Issue 8, pp. 873-888.

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Abstract

Reliable diagnosis of human helminth infection(s) is essential for ongoing disease surveillance and disease elimination. Current WHO-recommended diagnostic assays are unreliable in low-endemic near-elimination settings and typically involve the invasive, onerous and potentially hazardous sampling of bodily fluids such as stool and blood, as well as tissue via biopsy. In contrast, diagnosis by use of non-invasive urine sampling is generally painless, more convenient and low risk. It negates the need for specialist staff, can usually be obtained immediately upon request and is better accepted by patients. In some instances, urine-based diagnostic assays have also been shown to provide a more reliable diagnosis of infection when compared to traditional methods that require alternative and more invasive bodily samples, particularly in low-endemicity settings. Given these relative benefits, we identify and review current research literature to evaluate whether non-invasive urine sampling is currently exploited to its full potential in the development of diagnostic tools for human helminthiases. Though further development, assessment and validation is needed before their routine use in control programmes, low-cost, rapid and reliable assays capable of detecting transrenal helminth-derived antigens and cell-free DNA show excellent promise for future use at the point-of-care in high-, medium- and even low-endemicity elimination settings.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: QX Parasitology > Helminths. Annelida > QX 200 Helminths
QX Parasitology > QX 4 General works
WA Public Health > Health Problems of Special Population Groups > WA 395 Health in developing countries
WC Communicable Diseases > Tropical and Parasitic Diseases > WC 680 Tropical diseases (General)
WC Communicable Diseases > Tropical and Parasitic Diseases > WC 695 Parasitic diseases (General)
Faculty: Department: Biological Sciences > Department of Tropical Disease Biology
Education
Digital Object Identifer (DOI): https://doi.org/10.1017/S0031182019001732
Depositing User: Cathy Waldron
Date Deposited: 06 Jan 2020 13:15
Last Modified: 25 Jun 2020 13:07
URI: https://archive.lstmed.ac.uk/id/eprint/13443

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