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The consequences of Brugia malayi infection on the flight and energy resources of Aedes aegypti mosquitoes

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Somerville, Alastair, Gleave, Katherin, Jones, Chris ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-6504-6224 and Reimer, Lisa ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-9711-4981 (2019) 'The consequences of Brugia malayi infection on the flight and energy resources of Aedes aegypti mosquitoes'. Scientific Reports, Vol 9, e18449.

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Abstract

Evidence from experimental infection studies has shown that infected mosquitoes exhibit altered host-seeking behaviours, with suppression and activation of behaviours dependent on the parasite’s development stage. The mechanisms are poorly characterised; however, infections can impact mosquito energy reserves, thereby influencing key life-history traits and behaviours. In addition, filarial infection is likely detrimental to flight due to damage caused by developing worms. This study aimed to evaluate the impacts of Brugia malayi infection on Aedes aegypti flight parameters: distance, average speed, maximum speed and number of flight bursts, using a tethered flight mill. In addition, we explored whether differences in flight capacity may be due to the effect of infection on glycogen and lipid reserves. Infection with filarial worms significantly reduced flight distance but increased the number of flight bursts. Exposure to microfilaermic blood led to a significant decrease in average and maximum flight speeds even in the absence of an established infection. Mosquitoes fed on microfilaraemic blood showed reduced levels of glycogen (-37.9%) and lipids (-49.7%) compared to controls at nine days post-exposure. However, a one-hour period of flight activity caused an increase in lipid content for both infected and control mosquitoes. Consequential flight incapacitation may serve in explaining the heterogeneous distribution of lymphatic filariasis.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: QX Parasitology > Insects. Other Parasites > QX 510 Mosquitoes
QX Parasitology > Insects. Other Parasites > QX 525 Aedes
WC Communicable Diseases > Tropical and Parasitic Diseases > WC 850 Nematode infections (General)
WC Communicable Diseases > Tropical and Parasitic Diseases > WC 880 Filariasis and related conditions (General)
WH Hemic and Lymphatic Systems > Lymphatic System > WH 700 Lymphatic system. Lymphatic diseases (General)
Faculty: Department: Biological Sciences > Vector Biology Department
Digital Object Identifer (DOI): https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-019-54819-2
Depositing User: Mel Finley
Date Deposited: 14 Jan 2020 15:49
Last Modified: 16 Jan 2020 13:53
URI: https://archive.lstmed.ac.uk/id/eprint/13517

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