LSTM Home > LSTM Research > LSTM Online Archive

Transfusion‐transmitted hepatitis C: A cluster of cases in transfusion‐dependent thalassaemia patients in Sri Lanka

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year

Perera, Shiromi, Bonsall, David, Niriella, Madunil A., Allen, Angie, Peries, Anura C., Nelumdeniya, Udaya B., Dissanayake, Randima, Silva, Ishari, Cesare, Mariateresa, Klenerman, Paul, Weatherall, David J., Roberts, David J. and Premawardhena, Anuja P. (2020) 'Transfusion‐transmitted hepatitis C: A cluster of cases in transfusion‐dependent thalassaemia patients in Sri Lanka'. Transfusion Medicine. (In Press)

[img] Text
Revised HCV Paper 19.11.2019 FINAL.docx - Accepted Version
Restricted to Repository staff only until 9 January 2021.

Download (67kB)
[img] Text
Figures 1 & 2.pdf - Supplemental Material
Restricted to Repository staff only until 9 January 2021.

Download (84kB)

Abstract

Objectives
To report the clinical and virologic epidemiology of a recent epidemic of hepatitis C in thalassaemia patients in Sri Lanka.
Background
Transfusion‐dependent thalassaemia patients remain at risk for hepatitis C virus (HCV). Here, we report a cluster of recent HCV infections in Sri Lankan thalassaemia patients and examine the phylogenetic relationship of viral sequences.
Methods
We conducted two prospective cross‐sectional surveys of 513 patients in four Sri Lankan thalassaemia centres in 2014/2015 and re‐surveyed one centre in 2016. We screened for anti‐HCV antibodies using the CTK Biotech enzyme‐linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kits and confirmed active infection by reverse transcription‐polymerase chain reaction (RT‐PCR) for HCV‐RNA. HCV genomes were sequenced by unbiased target enrichment.
Results
Anti‐HCV antibodies were found in 116/513 (22.6%) of patients initially tested. Active hepatitis C infection was found in 26 patients with no cases of active hepatitis B infection. Of 26 patients with HCV, two were infected with genotype 1(a), and the rest had 3(a). In a single centre (Ragama), 122 patients (120 new cases and two previously tested, but negative) were retested for anti‐HCV antibodies. 32/122 (26.2%) patients were seropositive. Twenty‐three (23/122; 18.8%) of these new cases were confirmed by HCV PCR (all genotype 3[a]).
Conclusion
There is a significant cluster of recent HCV cases in multiply transfused thalassaemia patients in several centres in Sri Lanka. Most of the viruses shared a close phylogenetic relationship. The results are consistent with recent continuing transfusion‐transmitted HCV infection. Routine surveillance for HCV of chronically transfused patients is required irrespective of screening of blood products.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: WA Public Health > Health Problems of Special Population Groups > WA 395 Health in developing countries
WB Practice of Medicine > Therapeutics > WB 356 Blood transfusion
WC Communicable Diseases > Virus Diseases > Viral Hemorrhagic Fevers. Other Virus Diseases > WC 536 Human viral hepatitis
WH Hemic and Lymphatic Systems > Hematologic Diseases. Immunologic Factors. Blood Banks > WH 155 Anemia
WH Hemic and Lymphatic Systems > Hematologic Diseases. Immunologic Factors. Blood Banks > WH 460 Blood bank procedures
Faculty: Department: Biological Sciences > Department of Tropical Disease Biology
Digital Object Identifer (DOI): https://doi.org/10.1111/tme.12660
Depositing User: Stacy Murtagh
Date Deposited: 23 Jan 2020 15:02
Last Modified: 30 Jan 2020 14:28
URI: https://archive.lstmed.ac.uk/id/eprint/13565

Statistics

View details

Actions (login required)

Edit Item Edit Item