LSTM Home > LSTM Research > LSTM Online Archive

Improving the performance of spray operators through monitoring and evaluation of insecticide concentrationsof pirimiphos-methyl during indoor residual spraying for malaria control on Bioko Island

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year

Fuseini, Godwin, Ismail, Hanafy, Fricken, Michael E. von, Weppelmann, Thomas A, Smith, Jordan, Logan, Rhiannon ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-4323-3213, Oladepo, Folasade, Walker, Kyle, Phir, Wonder P, Paine, Mark ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-2061-7713 and Garcia, Guillermo A (2020) 'Improving the performance of spray operators through monitoring and evaluation of insecticide concentrationsof pirimiphos-methyl during indoor residual spraying for malaria control on Bioko Island'. Malaria Journal, Vol 19, e35.

[img]
Preview
Text
Fuseini_Actellic performance_Mal J_20.pdf - Accepted Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.

Download (1MB) | Preview

Abstract

Background: Quality control of indoor residual spraying (IRS) is necessary to ensure that spray operators (SOs)
deposit the correct concentration of insecticide on sprayed structures, while also confrming that spray records are not being falsifed.
Methods: Using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), this study conducted quality control of the organophosphate insecticide pirimiphos-methyl (Actellic 300CS), during the 2018 IRS round on Bioko Island, Equatorial Guinea. Approximately 60 SOs sprayed a total of 67,721 structures in 16,653 houses during the round. Houses that were reportedly sprayed were randomly selected for quality control testing. The SOs were monitored twice in 2018,
an initial screening in March followed by sharing of results with the IRS management team and identifcation of SOs to be re-trained, and a second screening in June to monitor the efectiveness of training. Insecticide samples were adhesive-lifted from wooden and cement structures and analysed using HPLC.
Results: The study suggests that with adequate quality control measures and refresher training, suboptimal spraying was curtailed, with a signifcant increased concentration delivered to the bedroom (diference=0.36, P<0.001) and wooden surfaces (diference 0.41, P=0.001). Additionally, an increase in efective coverage by SOs was observed, improving from 80.7% in March to 94.7% in June after re-training (McNemar’s test; P=0.03).
Conclusions: The ability to randomly select, locate, and test houses reportedly sprayed within a week via HPLC
has led to improvements in the performance of SOs on Bioko Island, enabling the project to better evaluate its own performance.
Keywords: Malaria, Indoor residual spraying, Vector control, Quality control, Bioko Island

Item Type: Article
Subjects: QX Parasitology > Insects. Other Parasites > QX 510 Mosquitoes
QX Parasitology > Insects. Other Parasites > QX 600 Insect control. Tick control
WA Public Health > Preventive Medicine > WA 110 Prevention and control of communicable diseases. Transmission of infectious diseases
WA Public Health > Preventive Medicine > WA 240 Disinfection. Disinfestation. Pesticides (including diseases caused by)
WA Public Health > Health Problems of Special Population Groups > WA 395 Health in developing countries
Faculty: Department: Biological Sciences > Vector Biology Department
Digital Object Identifer (DOI): https://doi.org/10.1186/s12936-020-3118-y
Depositing User: Mel Finley
Date Deposited: 28 Jan 2020 15:20
Last Modified: 30 Jan 2020 14:21
URI: https://archive.lstmed.ac.uk/id/eprint/13625

Statistics

View details

Actions (login required)

Edit Item Edit Item