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Testing a method of sampling for entomological determination of transmission of Wuchereria bancrofti to inform lymphatic filariasis treatment strategy in urban settings

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Rogers, Nditanchou, Dixon, Ruth, Dung, Pam, Lsiyaku, Sunday, Nwosu, Christian, Sanda, Safiya, Schmidt, Elena, Koudou, Benjami and Molyneux, David ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-8537-7947 (2020) 'Testing a method of sampling for entomological determination of transmission of Wuchereria bancrofti to inform lymphatic filariasis treatment strategy in urban settings'. Parasites & Vectors, Vol 13, E37.

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Abstract

Background: There is on-going debate about scale-up of lymphatic filariasis treatment to include urban areas. Determining Wuchereria bancrofti transmission is more complex in these settings and entomological methodologies suggested as a solution as yet have no clear guidance.
Methods: The study was conducted in six communities in Minna and Kaduna cities in Nigeria selected based on pre-disposing risk factors for mosquitoes and Transmission Assessment Survey (TAS) results in 2016 indicating need for treatment (> 1% prevalence). In each community, 4 gravid traps (GT), 15 exit traps (ET) and 21 pyrethrum spray catches (PSC) were used for 5 months targeting a sample size of 10,000 mosquitoes inclusive of at least 1500 Anopheles. Community researchers were selected and trained to facilitate community acceptability and carry out collection. We have evaluated the mosquito sampling and trapping methodology in terms of success at reaching targeted sample size, cost effectiveness, and applicability.
Results: Community researchers were influential in enabling high acceptability of the methods of collection and were able to conduct collections independently. Overall, 12.1% of trapping events (one trapping event corresponds to one visit to one trap to collect mosquitoes) were affected by householder actions, weather conditions or trap malfunction leading to lower than optimal catches. Exit traps were the most cost-effective way to catch Anopheles (6.4 USD per trapping event and 12.8 USD per Anopheles caught). Sample size of 10,000 mosquitoes overall in each city was met though Anopheles catch was insufficient in one city. However, sample size was met only in one implementation unit out of the four.
Conclusions: Methods need adapting to maximise Anopheles catch: we propose planning 250 gravid trap and 3724 exit trap trapping events in similar settings in West African urban areas where Culex is dominant, not using pyrethrum spray catches, and weighting trapping events later in the rainy season. Planning should increase involvement of community researchers, incorporate null catches and participants’ actions to predict catches. Importantly, evaluation units should be analogous with implementation units, the units at which treatment decisions will be made in the urban context.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: QX Parasitology > Helminths. Annelida > QX 301 Filarioidea
WA Public Health > Health Problems of Special Population Groups > WA 395 Health in developing countries
WC Communicable Diseases > Tropical and Parasitic Diseases > WC 880 Filariasis and related conditions (General)
Faculty: Department: Biological Sciences > Department of Tropical Disease Biology
Biological Sciences > Vector Biology Department
Digital Object Identifer (DOI): https://doi.org/10.1186/s13071-020-3905-x
Depositing User: Cathy Waldron
Date Deposited: 05 Mar 2020 12:54
Last Modified: 05 Mar 2020 14:41
URI: https://archive.lstmed.ac.uk/id/eprint/13891

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