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Increase in hospital mortality from non-communicable disease and HIV-related conditions in Bulawayo, Zimbabwe, between 1992 and 2000

Bardgett, H. P., Dixon, M. and Beeching, Nicholas ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-7019-8791 (2006) 'Increase in hospital mortality from non-communicable disease and HIV-related conditions in Bulawayo, Zimbabwe, between 1992 and 2000'. Tropical Doctor, Vol 36, Issue 3, pp. 129-131.

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Abstract

The HIV/AIDS pandemic is creating a strain on health care services in the developing world, with knock-on consequences for HIV negative patients. We looked for possible changes over time in the patterns of illness and outcomes of admission to an adult medical unit in Zimbabwe.
We performed a prospective descriptive study of discharge diagnoses and causes of in-hospital;mortality for all medical patients under the care of one consultant at Mpilo Central Hospital, Bulawayo, Zimbabwe. Two similar 7-month periods were compared in 1992 and 2000. Data recorded included: initials, sex, alive or dead status, diagnosis and HIV/AIDS status.
Similar numbers of patients were admitted in 1992 and 2000 (1305 and 1369), but in-hospital mortality increased from 13.3% to 28.6% (P < 0.001), especially in male patients (13.1% to 33.9% P < 0.001). Mortality rates increased for both infectious and non-communicable diseases such as cardiac failure, stroke and diabetes. The 10 most common diagnoses were similar, apart from Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (PCP) cases, which increased from 18 to 90. The proportion of patients clinically or serologically positive for HIV/AIDS rose from 13.9% to 51.1% (P < 0.001), but the number of cases of the HIV wasting syndrome (SLIM)/chronic gastroenteritis did not change significantly. In 1992 there happened to be a large number of cases of malaria transmission.
Mortality related to both communicable and non-communicable diseases increased, confirming that HIV negative patients are also being affected by the strain on health services. Although based on clinical and radiological diagnosis, PCP pneumonia appears to be increasingly common in this area.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: pneumocystis-carinii-pneumonia trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole pulmonary tuberculosis bacterial pneumonia positive patients cote-divoire abidjan trial
Subjects: WA Public Health > WA 30 Socioeconomic factors in public health (General)
WA Public Health > Health Problems of Special Population Groups > WA 395 Health in developing countries
WA Public Health > Statistics. Surveys > WA 900 Public health statistics
WC Communicable Diseases > Virus Diseases > Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome. HIV Infections > WC 503.4 Epidemiology
WC Communicable Diseases > Virus Diseases > Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome. HIV Infections > WC 503.41 General coverage
Faculty: Department: Groups (2002 - 2012) > Clinical Group
Digital Object Identifer (DOI): https://doi.org/10.1258/004947506777978217
Depositing User: Sarah Lewis-Newton
Date Deposited: 08 Mar 2011 14:38
Last Modified: 06 Feb 2018 13:01
URI: https://archive.lstmed.ac.uk/id/eprint/1444

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