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Future schistosome hybridizations: Will all Schistosoma haematobium hybrids please stand-up!

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Stothard, Russell ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-9370-3420, Kayuni, Seke, Alharbi, Mohammad, Musaya, Janelisa and Webster, Bonnie L. (2020) 'Future schistosome hybridizations: Will all Schistosoma haematobium hybrids please stand-up!'. PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases, Vol 14, Issue 7, e0008201.

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Abstract

nterrogating the genetic make-up of schistosome larvae (i.e. eggs, miracidia and cercariae) originating from definitive or intermediate snail hosts with molecular DNA methods has, by noting unexpected inter-species hybrids, started a revolution in our appraisal of African schistosomiasis [1-4]. Here, two dominant species of human schistosome exist, Schistosoma haematobium and S. mansoni, which are transmitted by specific intermediate freshwater snails, Bulinus spp. for the former and Biomphalaria spp. for the latter. The two schistosomes cause either urogenital or intestinal schistosomiasis, respectively [5] and depending on local snail distributions, schistosome transmission zones in the aquatic habitat may or may not overlap [6]. Within the S. haematobium group, a further 8 sister species are described with S. intercalatum and S. guineensis of medical importance, causing intestinal schistosomiasis while others, such as S. bovis, S. curassoni and S. mattheei occur in livestock, with the remaining species infecting wildlife. Schistosoma mattheei is also of medical interest for occasional infection and associated disease [7]. In contrast, S. mansoni has a single sister species, S. rodhaini, typically found in small rodents which can hybridise with S. mansoni, if given sufficient opportunity [2].

Item Type: Article
Subjects: QU Biochemistry > Proteins. Amino Acids. Peptides > QU 58.5 DNA.
WC Communicable Diseases > Tropical and Parasitic Diseases > WC 680 Tropical diseases (General)
WC Communicable Diseases > Tropical and Parasitic Diseases > WC 695 Parasitic diseases (General)
WC Communicable Diseases > Tropical and Parasitic Diseases > WC 810 Schistosomiasis
Faculty: Department: Biological Sciences > Department of Tropical Disease Biology
Digital Object Identifer (DOI): https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pntd.0008201
SWORD Depositor: JISC Pubrouter
Depositing User: Stacy Murtagh
Date Deposited: 03 Jul 2020 09:15
Last Modified: 03 Aug 2020 09:53
URI: https://archive.lstmed.ac.uk/id/eprint/14942

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