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Tolerance is the key to understanding antimalarial drug resistance

Hastings, Ian ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-1332-742X and Watkins, W. M. (2006) 'Tolerance is the key to understanding antimalarial drug resistance'. Trends in Parasitology, Vol 22, Issue 2, pp. 71-77.

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Abstract

The evolution of antimalarial drug resistance is often considered to be a single-stage process in which parasites are either fully resistant or completely sensitive to a drug. However, this does not take into account the important intermediate stage of drug tolerance. Drug-tolerant parasites are killed by the high serum concentrations of drugs that occur during direct treatment of the human host. However, these parasites can spread in the human population because many drugs persist long after treatment, and the tolerant parasites can infect people in which there are residual levels of the drugs. This intermediate stage between fully sensitive and fully resistant parasites has far-reaching implications for the evolution of drug-resistant malaria.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: uncomplicated falciparum-malaria kenyan plasmodium-falciparum elimination half-life sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine dihydrofolate-reductase combination chemotherapy artemether-lumefantrine selective pressure in-vitro africa
Subjects: QV Pharmacology > Anti-Inflammatory Agents. Anti-Infective Agents. Antineoplastic Agents > QV 256 Antimalarials
QV Pharmacology > QV 38 Drug action.
QV Pharmacology > QV 4 General works
QW Microbiology and Immunology > QW 45 Microbial drug resistance. General or not elsewhere classified.
QX Parasitology > Protozoa > QX 135 Plasmodia
QX Parasitology > QX 45 Host-parasite relations
WA Public Health > Preventive Medicine > WA 110 Prevention and control of communicable diseases. Transmission of infectious diseases
WB Practice of Medicine > Medical Climatology > WB 710 Diseases of geographic areas
WC Communicable Diseases > Tropical and Parasitic Diseases > WC 750 Malaria
Faculty: Department: Groups (2002 - 2012) > Molecular & Biochemical Parasitology Group
Digital Object Identifer (DOI): https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pt.2005.12.011
Depositing User: Sarah Lewis-Newton
Date Deposited: 17 Mar 2011 11:17
Last Modified: 06 Feb 2018 13:01
URI: https://archive.lstmed.ac.uk/id/eprint/1503

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