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Impact of political conflict on tuberculosis notifications in North-east Nigeria, Adamawa State: a 7-year retrospective analysis

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Pembi, Emmanuel, John, Stephen, Dumre, Shyam Prakash, Usman, Ahmadu Baba, Vuong, Nguyen Lam, Ebied, Amr, Mizukami, Shusaku, Huy, Nguyen Tien, Cuevas, Luis ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-6581-0587 and Hirayama, Kenji (2020) 'Impact of political conflict on tuberculosis notifications in North-east Nigeria, Adamawa State: a 7-year retrospective analysis'. BMJ Open, Vol 10, Issue 9, e035263.

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Abstract

Objective We assessed the impact of political conflict (Boko Haram) on tuberculosis (TB) case notifications in Adamawa State in North-east Nigeria.

Design A retrospective analysis of TB case notifications from TB registers (2010–2016) to describe changes in TB notification, sex and age ratios by the degree of conflict by local government area.

Setting Adamawa State.

Participants 21 076 TB cases notified.

Results 21 076 cases (62% male) were notified between 2010 and 2016, of which 19 604 (93%) were new TB cases. Areas affected by conflict in 2014 and 2015 had decreased case notification while neighbouring areas reported increased case notifications. The male to female ratio of TB cases changed in areas in conflict with more female cases being notified. The young and elderly (1–14 and >65 years old) had low notifications in all areas, with a small increase in case notifications during the years of conflict.

Conclusion TB case notifications decreased in conflict areas and increased in areas without conflict. More males were notified during peace times and more female cases were reported from areas in conflict. Young and elderly populations had decreased case notifications but experienced a slight increase during the conflict years. These changes are likely to reflect population displacement and a dissimilar effect of conflict on the accessibility of services. TB services in conflict areas deserve further study to identify resilient approaches that could reach affected populations.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: WA Public Health > WA 30 Socioeconomic factors in public health (General)
WA Public Health > Health Problems of Special Population Groups > WA 300 General. Refugees
WA Public Health > Health Problems of Special Population Groups > WA 395 Health in developing countries
WF Respiratory System > Tuberculosis > WF 200 Tuberculosis (General)
WF Respiratory System > Tuberculosis > WF 205.1 General coverage
Faculty: Department: Clinical Sciences & International Health > International Public Health Department
Digital Object Identifer (DOI): https://doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2019-035263
Depositing User: Christine Bradbury
Date Deposited: 18 Sep 2020 08:14
Last Modified: 23 Sep 2020 10:13
URI: https://archive.lstmed.ac.uk/id/eprint/15415

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