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Travellers and viral haemorrhagic fevers: what are the risks?

Beeching, Nicholas ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-7019-8791, Fletcher, Tom E, Hill, David R and Thomson, Gail L (2010) 'Travellers and viral haemorrhagic fevers: what are the risks?'. International Journal of Antimicrobial Agents, Vol 36S, S26-S35.

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Abstract

Viral haemorrhagic fevers (VHF) are caused by zoonotic viral infections transmitted to humans directly or by ticks or mosquitoes. The overall risk to travellers is conservatively estimated at <1 in 1 million travel episodes to African countries where infection is present, and febrile patients returning from these countries are at least 1000 times more likely to have malaria than Lassa fever or another VHF. No cases have been reported in fellow travellers exposed to a travelling case and only one asymptomatic seroconversion (to Lassa) has been reported in over 2000 contacts following care of VHF cases in modern Western hospital settings. However, healthcare-associated transmission of infection has been a major problem in some endemic settings. The potential for healthcare-associated infection and the threats posed by unrecognised or new agents necessitate a high index of suspicion and a standardised risk assessment approach to febrile travellers. Travel-related hantavirus infections are increasingly being reported from Europe and the Americas. This article summarises the epidemiology and reports of travel-related VHF cases in the past 40 years, together with strategies for their recognition, management and prevention

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: Travel, Viral haemorrhagic fever, Epidemiology, Risk prevention, Vaccine, Zoonosis
Subjects: QW Microbiology and Immunology > Immunotherapy and Hypersensitivity > QW 806 Vaccination
WC Communicable Diseases > Virus Diseases > Viral Hemorrhagic Fevers. Other Virus Diseases > WC 534 Viral hemorrhagic fevers
WC Communicable Diseases > Tropical and Parasitic Diseases > WC 680 Tropical diseases (General)
Faculty: Department: Groups (2002 - 2012) > Clinical Group
Digital Object Identifer (DOI): https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijantimicag.2010.06.017
Related URLs:
Depositing User: Users 43 not found.
Date Deposited: 16 Dec 2010 14:10
Last Modified: 09 Sep 2019 06:26
URI: https://archive.lstmed.ac.uk/id/eprint/1706

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