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HIV and tuberculosis coinfection in the southern region of Ethiopia: A prospective epidemiological study

Yassin, Mohammed A., Takele, L., Gebresenbet, S., Girma, E., Lera, M., Lendebo, E. and Cuevas, Luis ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-6581-0587 (2004) 'HIV and tuberculosis coinfection in the southern region of Ethiopia: A prospective epidemiological study'. Scandinavian Journal of Infectious Diseases, Vol 36, Issue 9, pp. 670-673.

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Abstract

HIV has played a key role in TB, modifying its incidence and clinical presentation. This study describes the prevalence of HIV among TB patients attending health facilities in the southern region of Ethiopia. The HIV prevalence was 18% for female and 21% for male TB patients. 15% and 30%, respectively, of the rural and urban patients with TB were HIV positive (p <0.05). 19% (51/261) smear-positive PTB, 26% (36/137) smear-negative PTB and 11% (10/94) of the extrapulmonary TB patients were HIV positive. The proportion of patients with extra-PTB varied from 11% to 38% across the centres and was highest in the zones with the lowest HIV prevalence. In the light of limited diagnostic facilities, clinicians often make a clinical diagnosis of TB without laboratory confirmation. The increase in the number of TB cases could be due to HIV. However, the number of health facilities offering TB treatment in the area also increased (from 53 to 236) during the same period and the increase in TB is likely to be the result of a combination of factors, including improved detection and HIV. It is important to consider this multi-factorial phenomenon when interpreting the increase of TB in a geographical area.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: human-immunodeficiency-virus pulmonary tuberculosis infection zambia diagnosis impact
Subjects: WA Public Health > Health Problems of Special Population Groups > WA 395 Health in developing countries
WC Communicable Diseases > Virus Diseases > Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome. HIV Infections > WC 503 Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. HIV infections
WC Communicable Diseases > Virus Diseases > Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome. HIV Infections > WC 503.5 Complications
WF Respiratory System > Tuberculosis > WF 200 Tuberculosis (General)
Faculty: Department: Groups (2002 - 2012) > Child & Reproductive Health Group
Digital Object Identifer (DOI): https://doi.org/10.1080/00365540410020848
Depositing User: Sarah Lewis-Newton
Date Deposited: 12 Jun 2012 15:20
Last Modified: 06 Feb 2018 13:03
URI: https://archive.lstmed.ac.uk/id/eprint/2222

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