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Investigating the spatial micro-epidemiology of diseases within a point-prevalence sample: a field applicable method for rapid mapping of households using low-cost GPS-dataloggers.

Stothard, Russell ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-9370-3420, Sousa-Figueiredo, J.C., Betson, Martha, Seto, Edmund Y W and Kabatereine, Narcis B (2011) 'Investigating the spatial micro-epidemiology of diseases within a point-prevalence sample: a field applicable method for rapid mapping of households using low-cost GPS-dataloggers.'. Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, Vol 105, Issue 9, pp. 500-506.

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Abstract

Point-prevalence recording of the distribution of tropical parasitic diseases at village level is usually sufficient for general monitoring and surveillance. Whilst within-village spatial patterning of diseases exists, and can be important, mapping infected cases in a household-by-household setting is arduous and time consuming. With the development of low-cost GPS-data loggers (< £40) and available GoogleEarth(TM) satellite imagery, we present a field-applicable method based on crowdsourcing for rapid identification of infected cases (intestinal schistosomiasis, malaria and hookworm) by household. A total of 126 mothers with their 247 preschool children from Bukoba village (Mayuge District, Uganda) were examined with half of these mothers given a GPS-data logger to walk home with, returning the unit the same day for data off-loading, after which, households were assigned GPS coordinates. A satellite image of Bukoba was annotated with households denoting the infection status of each mother and child. General prevalence of intestinal schistosomiasis, malaria and hookworm in mothers and children was: 27.2 vs 7.7%, 28.6 vs 87.0% and 60.0 vs 22.3%, respectively. Different spatial patterns of disease could be identified likely representing the intrinsic differences in parasite biology and interplay with human behaviour(s) across this local landscape providing a better insight into reasons for disease micro-patterning.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: WA Public Health > WA 105 Epidemiology
WA Public Health > Health Problems of Special Population Groups > WA 395 Health in developing countries
WB Practice of Medicine > Medical Climatology > WB 700 Medical climatology. Geography of disease
Digital Object Identifer (DOI): https://doi.org/10.1016/j.trstmh.2011.05.007
Depositing User: Tina Bowers
Date Deposited: 19 Nov 2013 15:19
Last Modified: 27 Sep 2018 10:36
URI: http://archive.lstmed.ac.uk/id/eprint/2266

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