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Cryptic Diversity within the Major Trypanosomiasis Vector Glossina fuscipes Revealed by Molecular Markers

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Dyer, Naomi, Ravel, Sophie, Choi, K.S., Darby, Alistair C., Causse, Sandrine, Kapitano, Berisha, Hall, Martin J. R., Steen, Keith ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-8933-8643, Lutumba, Pascal, Madinga, Joules, Torr, Stephen J., Okedi, Loyce M., Lehane, Mike and Donnelly, Martin ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5218-1497 (2011) 'Cryptic Diversity within the Major Trypanosomiasis Vector Glossina fuscipes Revealed by Molecular Markers'. PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases, Vol 5, Issue 8, e1266.

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Abstract

Background

The tsetse fly Glossina fuscipes s.l. is responsible for the transmission of approximately 90% of cases of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) or sleeping sickness. Three G. fuscipes subspecies have been described, primarily based upon subtle differences in the morphology of their genitalia. Here we describe a study conducted across the range of this important vector to determine whether molecular evidence generated from nuclear DNA (microsatellites and gene sequence information), mitochondrial DNA and symbiont DNA support the existence of these taxa as discrete taxonomic units.

Principal Findings

The nuclear ribosomal Internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) provided support for the three subspecies. However nuclear and mitochondrial sequence data did not support the monophyly of the morphological subspecies G. f. fuscipes or G. f. quanzensis. Instead, the most strongly supported monophyletic group was comprised of flies sampled from Ethiopia. Maternally inherited loci (mtDNA and symbiont) also suggested monophyly of a group from Lake Victoria basin and Tanzania, but this group was not supported by nuclear loci, suggesting different histories of these markers. Microsatellite data confirmed strong structuring across the range of G. fuscipes s.l., and was useful for deriving the interrelationship of closely related populations.

Conclusion/Significance

We propose that the morphological classification alone is not used to classify populations of G. fuscipes for control purposes. The Ethiopian population, which is scheduled to be the target of a sterile insect release (SIT) programme, was notably discrete. From a programmatic perspective this may be both positive, given that it may reflect limited migration into the area or negative if the high levels of differentiation are also reflected in reproductive isolation between this population and the flies to be used in the release programme.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: The original, electronic version is found at: http://www.plosntds.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pntd.0001266
Subjects: QU Biochemistry > Genetics > QU 450 General Works
QX Parasitology > Insects. Other Parasites > QX 505 Diptera
WC Communicable Diseases > Tropical and Parasitic Diseases > WC 705 Trypanosomiasis
Faculty: Department: Groups (2002 - 2012) > Vector Group
Digital Object Identifer (DOI): https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pntd.0001266
Depositing User: Users 183 not found.
Date Deposited: 26 Aug 2011 13:26
Last Modified: 06 Feb 2018 13:03
URI: https://archive.lstmed.ac.uk/id/eprint/2302

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