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Malathion resistance and prevalence of the malathion carboxylesterase mechanism in populations of mosquito vectors of disease in Sri Lanka

Karunaratne, S. H. P. P. and Hemingway, Janet ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-3200-7173 (2001) 'Malathion resistance and prevalence of the malathion carboxylesterase mechanism in populations of mosquito vectors of disease in Sri Lanka'. Bulletin of the World Health Organization, Vol 79, Issue 11, pp. 1060-1064.

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Abstract

Objective To determine the levels of malathion resistance and prevalence of the malathion carboxylesterase mechanism among mosquitoes in Sri Lanka. Methods Bioassays were carried out using WHO-recommended methods on samples of the following Sri Lankan mosquito vectors: Culex quinquefasciatus, C tritaeniorhynchus, C. gelidus; Anopheles culicifacies B, A subpictus; Aedes aegypti and A. albopictus. Findings M a lath ion-specific carboxylesterase mechanisms were found in A. culicifacies and A. subpictus, both giving high rates of insecticide metabolism. In contrast, malathion resistance in C quinquefasciatus and C. tritaeniorhynchus is linked to broad-spectrum resistance to organophosphorus compounds due to elevated levels of esterases that sequester malaoxon, but are unable to metabolize malathion. Conclusions Resistance among the Anopheles spp. must have occurred as a direct result of antimalarial activities, since malathion use in Sri Lanka is limited to public health treatments. In contrast, resistance among Culex spp. has resulted from large-scale use of the organophosphorus insecticide group as larvicides for filariasis control and on rice paddy, where C, tritaeniorhynchus predominantly breeds, for agricultural purposes.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: QW Microbiology and Immunology > QW 52 Physiology and chemistry of microorganisms. Metabolism.
QX Parasitology > Insects. Other Parasites > QX 510 Mosquitoes
QX Parasitology > Insects. Other Parasites > QX 600 Insect control. Tick control
WC Communicable Diseases > Tropical and Parasitic Diseases > WC 765 Prevention and control
Faculty: Department: Pre 2002
Depositing User: Users 494 not found.
Date Deposited: 17 Jan 2013 11:03
Last Modified: 06 Feb 2018 13:03
URI: https://archive.lstmed.ac.uk/id/eprint/2313

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