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Early Deaths During Tuberculosis Treatment Are Associated With Depressed Innate Responses,Bacterial Infection, and Tuberculosis Progression

Waitt, Catriona, Banda, N. Peter K., White, Sarah A., Kampmann, Beate, Kumwenda, Jean, Heyderman, Robert, Pirmohamed, Munir and Squire, Bertie ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-7173-9038 (2011) 'Early Deaths During Tuberculosis Treatment Are Associated With Depressed Innate Responses,Bacterial Infection, and Tuberculosis Progression'. Journal of Infectious Disease, Vol 2011, Issue 204, pp. 358-362.

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Abstract

Up to 14% of Malawian adults die during the intensive phase of tuberculosis treatment. In a prospective cohort of 199 Malawian adults with microbiologically confirmed pulmonary tuberculosis, clinical and laboratory parameters were compared between those who died or deteriorated with those who had an uneventful recovery. Baseline tumor necrosis factor alpha responses to stimulation with heat-killed Mycobacterium tuberculosis and lipopolysaccharide were reduced among the 22 patients with poor outcome (P = .017). Low body mass index (P = .002) and elevated respiratory rate (P = .01) at tuberculosis diagnosis independently predicted poor outcome. Validation of a clinical score identifying high-risk individuals is warranted, together with further investigation of immunological derangements.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: This article is open access and can be accessed via the official URL referenced with this article.
Subjects: WF Respiratory System > Tuberculosis > WF 200 Tuberculosis (General)
WF Respiratory System > Tuberculosis > WF 220 Diagnosis. Prognosis
WF Respiratory System > Tuberculosis > WF 250 Immunological aspects
WF Respiratory System > Tuberculosis > WF 310 Therapy
Digital Object Identifer (DOI): https://doi.org/10.1093/infdis/jir265
Depositing User: Helen Rigby
Date Deposited: 09 Nov 2011 16:18
Last Modified: 07 Dec 2018 09:54
URI: http://archive.lstmed.ac.uk/id/eprint/2408

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