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Nutritional recovery in HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected children with severe acute malnutrition

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Fergusson, P., Chinkhumba, J., Grijalva-Eternod, C., Banda, T., Mkangama, C. and Tomkins, A. (2009) 'Nutritional recovery in HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected children with severe acute malnutrition'. Archives of Disease in Childhood, Vol 94, Issue 7, pp. 512-516.

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Abstract

Objective: Few studies have reported on nutritional recovery, survival and growth among severely malnourished children with HIV. This study explores nutritional recovery in HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected children during inpatient nutrition rehabilitation and 4 months of follow-up. Design: Prospective cohort study. Setting: Lilongwe district, Malawi. Main outcome measures: Weight gain, anthropometrics. Results: In our sample of 454 children with severe acute malnutrition (SAM), 17.4% (n = 79) of children were HIV infected. None of the children were on antiretroviral therapy upon admission. Among the HIV-infected children, 35.4% (28/79) died, compared with 10.4% (39/375) in HIV-uninfected children (p<0.001). All children who survived achieved nutritional recovery (>85% weight for height and no oedema), regardless of HIV status. HIV-infected children had similar weight gain to HIV-uninfected children (8.9 vs 8.0 g/kg/d, not significant (NS)). Mean increases in z-scores for both subscapular (2.72 vs 2.69, NS) and triceps (1.26 vs 1.48, NS) skinfolds were similar between HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected children, respectively, during nutrition rehabilitation. 362 children were followed for 4 months, at which time mean weight for height z-score was similar in HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected children (20.85 vs 20.64, NS). Conclusions: HIV-infected children with SAM have higher mortality rates than HIV-uninfected children. Among those who survive, however, nutritional recovery is similar in HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected children.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: Original article published in Arch Dis Child 2009;94:512-516 doi:10.1136/adc.2008.142646. URL: http://adc.bmj.com/content/94/7/512.full
Subjects: WC Communicable Diseases > Virus Diseases > Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome. HIV Infections > WC 503 Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. HIV infections
WS Pediatrics > Child Care. Nutrition. Physical Examination > WS 115 Nutritional requirements. Nutrition disorders
WC Communicable Diseases > Virus Diseases > Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome. HIV Infections > WC 503.5 Complications
WS Pediatrics > By Age Groups > WS 440 Preschool child
WS Pediatrics > By Age Groups > WS 430 Infancy
Faculty: Department: Groups (2002 - 2012) > Disease Control Strategy Group
Digital Object Identifer (DOI): https://doi.org/10.1136/adc.2008.142646
Depositing User: Tina Bowers
Date Deposited: 12 Jul 2010 14:16
Last Modified: 06 Feb 2018 12:59
URI: http://archive.lstmed.ac.uk/id/eprint/265

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