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Zoonotic species of Cryptosporidium are as prevalent as the anthroponotic in HIV-infected patients in Thailand

Gatei, Wangeci, Suputtamongkol, Y., Waywa, D., Ashford, R.W., Bailey, Wendi, Greensill, J., Beeching, Nicholas ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-7019-8791 and Hart, C. Anthony (2002) 'Zoonotic species of Cryptosporidium are as prevalent as the anthroponotic in HIV-infected patients in Thailand'. Annals of Tropical Medicine and Parasitology, Vol 96, Issue 8, pp. 797-802.

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Abstract

The epidemiology of chronic diarrhoea in adults with late-stage HIV infection was investigated in a prospective study in Bangkok, Thailand. During this investigation, 34 Cryptosporidium isolates were obtained from the faeces of 36 patients, with mean CD4(+) counts of only 14 x 10(6) CD4(+) cells/litre (range = 2 x 10(6) - 53 x 10(6)/litre), who had symptomatic cryptosporidiosis. Genotyping of these isolates, by RFLP analysis and DNA sequencing of the hypervariable region of the 18S rRNA gene, indicated that only 17 (50%) were of the C. parvum human genotype. The rest were of C. meleagridis (seven), the C. parvum 'bovine' genotype (five), C. felis (three) and C. canis (two). Extensive genotypic heterogeneity was observed among the C. parvum isolates, and two other isolates, one of C. meleagridis and the other of C. felis, produced atypical restriction patterns and were only identified by sequencing. This appears to represent the first report of C. canis and the 'bovine' genotype of C. parvum in HIV-infected Thai patients.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: QX Parasitology > Protozoa > QX 123 Apicomplexa
WA Public Health > Health Problems of Special Population Groups > WA 395 Health in developing countries
WA Public Health > Statistics. Surveys > WA 950 Theory or methods of medical statistics. Epidemiologic methods
WC Communicable Diseases > Virus Diseases > Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome. HIV Infections > WC 503 Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. HIV infections
Faculty: Department: Groups (2002 - 2012) > Clinical Group
Groups (2002 - 2012) > Molecular & Biochemical Parasitology Group
Digital Object Identifer (DOI): https://doi.org/10.1179/000349802125002202
Depositing User: Users 494 not found.
Date Deposited: 21 Jan 2013 15:35
Last Modified: 06 Feb 2018 13:05
URI: http://archive.lstmed.ac.uk/id/eprint/2918

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