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Population genetic structure of Schistosoma mansoni and Schistosoma haematobium from across six sub-Saharan African countries: Implications for epidemiology, evolution and control.

Gower, Charlotte M, Gouvras, Anouk N, Lamberton, Poppy H L, Deol, Arminder, Shrivastava, Jaya, Mutombo, Polydor N, Mbuh, Judith V, Norton, Alice J, Webster, Bonnie L, Stothard, Russell ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-9370-3420, Garba, Amadou, Lamine, Mariama S, Kariuki, Curtis, Lange, N Charles, Mkoji, Gerald M, Kabatereine, Narcis B, Gabrielli, Albis F, Rudge, James W, Fenwick, Alan, Sacko, Moussa, Dembelé, Robert, Lwambo, Nicholas J S, Tchuem Tchuenté, Louis-Albert, Rollinson, David and Webster, Joanne P (2013) 'Population genetic structure of Schistosoma mansoni and Schistosoma haematobium from across six sub-Saharan African countries: Implications for epidemiology, evolution and control.'. Acta Tropica, Vol 128, Issue 2, pp. 261-274.

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Abstract

We conducted the first meta-analysis of ten Schistosoma haematobium (one published and nine unpublished) and eight Schistosoma mansoni (two published and six unpublished) microsatellite datasets collected from individual schistosome-infected school-children across six sub-Saharan Africa countries. High levels of genetic diversity were documented in both S. haematobium and S. mansoni. In S. haematobium populations, allelic richness did not differ significantly between the ten schools, despite widely varying prevalences and intensities of infection, but higher levels of heterozygote deficiency were seen in East than in West Africa. In contrast, S. mansoni populations were more diverse in East than West African schools, but heterozygosity levels did not vary significantly with geography. Genetic structure in both S. haematobium and S. mansoni populations was documented, at both a regional and continental scale. Such structuring might be expected to slow the spread to new areas of anti-schistosomal drug resistance should it develop. There was, however, limited evidence of genetic structure at the individual host level, which might be predicted to promote the development or establishment of drug resistance, particularly if it were a recessive trait. Our results are discussed in terms of their potential implications for the epidemiology and evolution of schistosomes as well as their subsequent control across sub-Saharan Africa.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: QU Biochemistry > Genetics > QU 470 Genetic structures
QX Parasitology > Helminths. Annelida > QX 355 Schistosoma
WA Public Health > Preventive Medicine > WA 110 Prevention and control of communicable diseases. Transmission of infectious diseases
WA Public Health > Health Problems of Special Population Groups > WA 395 Health in developing countries
WC Communicable Diseases > Tropical and Parasitic Diseases > WC 810 Schistosomiasis
Faculty: Department: Biological Sciences > Department of Tropical Disease Biology
Digital Object Identifer (DOI): https://doi.org/10.1016/j.actatropica.2012.09.014
Depositing User: Mary Creegan
Date Deposited: 23 Oct 2013 10:27
Last Modified: 06 Feb 2018 13:05
URI: https://archive.lstmed.ac.uk/id/eprint/3271

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