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The Importance of Mosquito Behavioural Adaptations to Malaria Control in Africa

Gatton, Michelle, Chitnis, Nakul, Churcher, Thomas, Donnelly, Martin ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5218-1497, Ghani, Azra C, Godfray, H. Charles, Gould, Fred, Hastings, Ian ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-1332-742X, Marshall, John, Ranson, Hilary ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-2332-8247, Rowland, Mark, Shaman, Jeff and Lindsay, Steve (2013) 'The Importance of Mosquito Behavioural Adaptations to Malaria Control in Africa'. Evolution, Vol 67, Issue 4, pp. 1218-1230.

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Abstract

Over the past decade the use of long-lasting insecticidal nets (LLINs), in combination with improved drug therapies, indoor residual spraying (IRS), and better health infrastructure, has helped reduce malaria in many African countries for the first time in a generation. However, insecticide resistance in the vector is an evolving threat to these gains. We review emerging and historical data on behavioral resistance in response to LLINs and IRS. Overall the current literature suggests behavioral and species changes may be emerging, but the data are sparse and, at times unconvincing. However, preliminary modeling has demonstrated that behavioral resistance could have significant impacts on the effectiveness of malaria control. We propose seven recommendations to improve understanding of resistance in malaria vectors. Determining the public health impact of physiological and behavioral insecticide resistance is an urgent priority if we are to maintain the significant gains made in reducing malaria morbidity and mortality.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: Article is Open Access
Uncontrolled Keywords: Anopheles; indoor residual spraying; insecticidal nets; resistance
Subjects: QX Parasitology > Insects. Other Parasites > QX 510 Mosquitoes
QX Parasitology > Insects. Other Parasites > QX 515 Anopheles
QX Parasitology > Insects. Other Parasites > QX 600 Insect control. Tick control
WA Public Health > Preventive Medicine > WA 110 Prevention and control of communicable diseases. Transmission of infectious diseases
WA Public Health > Preventive Medicine > WA 240 Disinfection. Disinfestation. Pesticides (including diseases caused by)
WA Public Health > Health Problems of Special Population Groups > WA 395 Health in developing countries
WB Practice of Medicine > Medical Climatology > WB 710 Diseases of geographic areas
Faculty: Department: Biological Sciences > Department of Tropical Disease Biology
Biological Sciences > Vector Biology Department
Digital Object Identifer (DOI): https://doi.org/10.1111/evo.12063
Depositing User: Samantha Sheldrake
Date Deposited: 08 Apr 2013 09:25
Last Modified: 06 Feb 2018 13:06
URI: http://archive.lstmed.ac.uk/id/eprint/3365

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