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An Investigation into the Protein Composition of the Teneral Glossina morsitans morsitans Peritrophic Matrix.

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Rose, Clair ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-7782-5359, Belmonte, Rodrigo, Armstrong, Stuart D, Molyneux, Gemma, Haines, Lee ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-8821-6479, Lehane, Mike, Wastling, Jonathan and Acosta Serrano, Alvaro (2014) 'An Investigation into the Protein Composition of the Teneral Glossina morsitans morsitans Peritrophic Matrix.'. PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases, Vol 8, Issue 4, e2691.

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Abstract

BACKGROUND

Tsetse flies serve as biological vectors for several species of African trypanosomes. In order to survive, proliferate and establish a midgut infection, trypanosomes must cross the tsetse fly peritrophic matrix (PM), which is an acellular gut lining surrounding the blood meal. Crossing of this multi-layered structure occurs at least twice during parasite migration and development, but the mechanism of how trypanosomes do so is not understood. In order to better comprehend the molecular events surrounding trypanosome penetration of the tsetse PM, a mass spectrometry-based approach was applied to investigate the PM protein composition using Glossina morsitans morsitans as a model organism.

METHODS

PMs from male teneral (young, unfed) flies were dissected, solubilised in urea/SDS buffer and the proteins precipitated with cold acetone/TCA. The PM proteins were either subjected to an in-solution tryptic digestion or fractionated on 1D SDS-PAGE, and the resulting bands digested using trypsin. The tryptic fragments from both preparations were purified and analysed by LC-MS/MS.

RESULTS

Overall, nearly 300 proteins were identified from both analyses, several of those containing signature Chitin Binding Domains (CBD), including novel peritrophins and peritrophin-like glycoproteins, which are essential in maintaining PM architecture and may act as trypanosome adhesins. Furthermore, 27 proteins from the tsetse secondary endosymbiont, Sodalis glossinidius, were also identified, suggesting this bacterium is probably in close association with the tsetse PM.

CONCLUSION

To our knowledge this is the first report on the protein composition of teneral G. m. morsitans, an important vector of African trypanosomes. Further functional analyses of these proteins will lead to a better understanding of the tsetse physiology and may help identify potential molecular targets to block trypanosome development within the tsetse.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: QU Biochemistry > QU 4 General works
QU Biochemistry > Proteins. Amino Acids. Peptides > QU 58.5 DNA.
QX Parasitology > QX 45 Host-parasite relations
QX Parasitology > Insects. Other Parasites > QX 505 Diptera
QX Parasitology > Insects. Other Parasites > QX 650 Insect vectors
WC Communicable Diseases > Tropical and Parasitic Diseases > WC 705 Trypanosomiasis
Faculty: Department: Biological Sciences > Department of Tropical Disease Biology
Biological Sciences > Vector Biology Department
Digital Object Identifer (DOI): https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pntd.0002691
Depositing User: Mary Creegan
Date Deposited: 30 Apr 2014 14:05
Last Modified: 01 Jun 2018 14:31
URI: http://archive.lstmed.ac.uk/id/eprint/3683

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