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Adaptive introgression between Anopheles sibling species eliminates a major genomic island but not reproductive isolation

Clarkson, Christopher S., Weetman, David ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-5820-1388, Essandoh, John, Yawson, Alexander E., Maslen, Gareth, Manske, Magnus, Field, Stuart G., Webster, Mark, Rodrigues Antao, Tiago, MacInnis, Bronwyn, Kwiatkowski, Dominic and Donnelly, Martin ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5218-1497 (2014) 'Adaptive introgression between Anopheles sibling species eliminates a major genomic island but not reproductive isolation'. Nature Communications, Vol 5, :4248.

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Abstract

Adaptive introgression can provide novel genetic variation to fuel rapid evolutionary responses, though it may be counterbalanced by potential for detrimental disruption of the recipient genomic background. We examine the extent and impact of recent introgression of a strongly selected insecticide-resistance mutation (Vgsc-1014F) located within one of two exceptionally large genomic islands of divergence separating the Anopheles gambiae species pair. Here we show that transfer of the Vgsc mutation results in homogenization of the entire genomic island region (~1.5% of the genome) between species. Despite this massive disruption, introgression is clearly adaptive with a dramatic rise in frequency of Vgsc-1014F and no discernable impact on subsequent reproductive isolation between species. Our results show (1) how resilience of genomes to massive introgression can permit rapid adaptive response to anthropogenic selection and (2) that even extreme prominence of genomic islands of divergence can be an unreliable indicator of importance in speciation.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: QU Biochemistry > Genetics > QU 500 Genetic phenomena
QX Parasitology > Insects. Other Parasites > QX 510 Mosquitoes
QX Parasitology > Insects. Other Parasites > QX 515 Anopheles
Faculty: Department: Biological Sciences > Vector Biology Department
Digital Object Identifer (DOI): https://doi.org/10.1038/ncomms5248
Depositing User: Martin Chapman
Date Deposited: 25 Jun 2014 15:42
Last Modified: 02 Feb 2018 16:38
URI: http://archive.lstmed.ac.uk/id/eprint/3784

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