LSTM Home > LSTM Research > LSTM Online Archive

Feasibility study for early supported discharge in adults with respiratory infection in the UK

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year

Collins, Andrea ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-4094-1572, Eneje, Odiri J, Hancock, Carole A, Wootton, Dan and Gordon, Stephen ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-6576-1116 (2014) 'Feasibility study for early supported discharge in adults with respiratory infection in the UK'. BMC Pulmonary Medicine, Vol 14, e25.

[img]
Preview
Text
BMC_Pul_Med_14_25.pdf - Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.

Download (299kB)

Abstract

Background

Many patients with pneumonia and lower respiratory tract infection that could be treated as outpatients according to their clinical severity score, are in fact admitted to hospital. We investigated whether, with medical and social input, these patients could be discharged early and treated at home.

Objectives: (1) To assess the feasibility of providing an early supported discharge scheme for patients with pneumonia and lower respiratory tract infection (2) To assess the patient acceptability of a study comprising of randomisation to standard hospital care or early supported discharge scheme.

Methods

Design: Randomised controlled trial.

Setting: Liverpool, UK. Two University Teaching hospitals; one city-centre, 1 suburban in Liverpool, a city with high deprivation scores and unemployment rates.

Participants: 200 patients screened: 14 community-dwelling patients requiring an acute hospital stay for pneumonia or lower respiratory tract infection were recruited.

Intervention: Early supported discharge scheme to provide specialist respiratory care in a patient’s own home as a substitute to acute hospital care.

Main outcome measures: Primary - patient acceptability. Secondary – safety/mortality, length of hospital stay, readmission, patient/carer (or next of kin) satisfaction, functional status and symptom improvement.

Results

42 of the 200 patients screened were eligible for early supported discharge; 10 were only identified at the point of discharge, 18 declined participation and 14 were randomised to either early supported discharge or standard hospital care. The total hospital length of hospital stay was 8.33 (1–31) days in standard hospital care and 3.4 (1–7) days in the early supported discharge scheme arm. In the early supported discharge scheme arm patient carers reported higher satisfaction with care and there were less readmissions and hospital-acquired infections.

Limitations: A small study in a single city. This was a feasibility study and therefore not intended to compare outcome data.

Conclusions

An early supported discharge scheme for patients with pneumonia and lower respiratory tract infection was feasible. Larger numbers of patients would be eligible if future work included patients with dementia and those residing in care homes.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: W General Medicine. Health Professions > Health Services. Patients and Patient Advocacy > W 85 Patients. Attitude and compliance
W General Medicine. Health Professions > Health Services. Patients and Patient Advocacy > W 84 Health services. Delivery of health care
WA Public Health > WA 30 Socioeconomic factors in public health (General)
WF Respiratory System > WF 140 Diseases of the respiratory system (General)
Faculty: Department: Clinical Sciences & International Health > Clinical Sciences Department
Digital Object Identifer (DOI): https://doi.org/10.1186/1471-2466-14-25
Depositing User: Julie Franco
Date Deposited: 21 Aug 2014 09:23
Last Modified: 07 Oct 2019 08:24
URI: https://archive.lstmed.ac.uk/id/eprint/3861

Statistics

View details

Actions (login required)

Edit Item Edit Item