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Ensuring HIV-infected pregnant women start antiretroviral treatment: an operational cohort study from Lilongwe, Malawi

Weigel, Ralf ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-9034-2634, Hosseinipour, Mina C., Feldacker, Caryl, Gareta, Dickman, Tweya, Hannock, Chiwoko, Jane, Gumulira, Joe, Kalulu, Mike, Mofolo, Innocent, Kamanga, Esmie, Mwale, Gertrude, Kadzakumanja, Angela, Jere, Edward and Phiri, Sam (2012) 'Ensuring HIV-infected pregnant women start antiretroviral treatment: an operational cohort study from Lilongwe, Malawi'. Tropical Medicine & International Health, Vol 17, Issue 6, pp. 751-759.

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Abstract

Objectives:  HIV-infected women identified through antenatal care (ANC) often fail to access antiretroviral treatment (ART), leaving them and their infants at risk for declining health or HIV transmission. We describe results of measures to improve uptake of ART among eligible pregnant women.
Methods:  Between October 2006 and December 2009, interventions implemented at ANC and ART facilities in urban Lilongwe aimed to better link services for women with CD4 counts <250/μl. A monitoring system followed women referred for ART to examine trends and improve practices in referral completion, on-time ART initiation and ART retention.
Results:  Six hundred and twelve women were ART eligible: 604 (99%) received their CD4 result, 344 (56%) reached the clinic, 286 (47%) started ART while pregnant and 261 (43%) were either alive on ART or transferred out after 6 months. Between 2006 and 2009, the median (IQR) time between CD4 blood draw and ART initiation fell from 41 days (17, 349) to 15 days (7,42) (P = 0.183); the proportion of eligible individuals starting ART while pregnant and retained for 6 months improved from 17% to 65% (P < 0.001). Delays generally shortened within the continuum of care from 2006 to 2009; however, time from CD4 blood draw to ART referral increased from 7 to 14 days.
Conclusions:  Referrals between facilities and delays through CD4 count measurements create bottlenecks in patient care. Retention improved over time, but delays within the linkage process remained. ART initiation at ANC plus use of point-of-care CD4 tests may further enhance ART uptake.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: HIV prevention of mother-to-child transmission; referral system strengthening; antiretroviral treatment; pregnancy; sub-Saharan Africa; Malawi; HIV
Subjects: W General Medicine. Health Professions > Health Services. Patients and Patient Advocacy > W 85 Patients. Attitude and compliance
WA Public Health > Health Problems of Special Population Groups > WA 310 Maternal welfare
WA Public Health > Health Problems of Special Population Groups > WA 395 Health in developing countries
WC Communicable Diseases > Virus Diseases > Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome. HIV Infections > WC 503 Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. HIV infections
WC Communicable Diseases > Virus Diseases > Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome. HIV Infections > WC 503.2 Therapy
WQ Obstetrics > Pregnancy Complications > WQ 256 Infectious diseases
Faculty: Department: Groups (2002 - 2012) > International Health Group
Digital Object Identifer (DOI): https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-3156.2012.02980.x
Depositing User: Martin Chapman
Date Deposited: 09 Dec 2014 10:57
Last Modified: 06 Feb 2018 13:08
URI: http://archive.lstmed.ac.uk/id/eprint/4625

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