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Household Air Pollution Causes Dose-dependent Inflammation and Altered Phagocytosis in Human Macrophages

Rylance, Jamie ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-2323-3611, Fullerton, Duncan, Scriven, James, Aljurayyan, Abdullah N., Mzinza, David, Barrett, Steve, Wright, Adam KA, Wootton, Daniel G, Glennie, Sarah J., Baple, Katy, Knott, Amy, Mortimer, Kevin ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-8118-8871, Russell, David G, Heyderman, Robert S and Gordon, Stephen ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-6576-1116 (2014) 'Household Air Pollution Causes Dose-dependent Inflammation and Altered Phagocytosis in Human Macrophages'. American Journal of Respiratory Cell and Molecular Biology, Vol 52, Issue 5, pp. 584-593.

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Abstract

Background
Three billion people are exposed to household air pollution from biomass fuel use. Exposure is associated with higher incidence of pneumonia, and possibly tuberculosis. Understanding mechanisms underlying these defects would improve preventive strategies.

Methods
We used human alveolar macrophages obtained from healthy Malawian adults exposed naturally to household air pollution, and compared with human monocyte-derived macrophages exposed in vitro to respirable-sized particulates. Cellular inflammatory response was assessed by: IL-6 and IL-8 production in response to particulate challenge; phagocytosis of fluorescent-labelled beads and intraphagosomal oxidative burst capacity; ingestion and killing of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Mycobacterium tuberculosis measured by microscopy and quantitative culture. Particulate ingestion was quantified by digital image analysis.

Results
We were able to reproduce the carbon loading of naturally exposed alveolar macrophages by in vitro exposure of monocyte derived macrophages. Fine carbon black induced IL-8 release from monocyte derived and alveolar macrophages (p<0.05), with similar magnitude responses (log10 increases of 0.93 [SEM 0.2] vs 0.74 [SEM 0.19] respectively). Phagocytosis of pneumococci and mycobacteria was impaired with higher particulate loading. High particulate loading corresponded with a lower oxidative burst capacity (p=0.0015). There was no overall effect on killing of M. tuberculosis.

Conclusion
Alveolar macrophage function is altered by particulate loading. Our macrophage model is comparable morphologically to the in vivo uptake of particulates. Wood smoke exposed cells demonstrate reduced phagocytosis but unaffected mycobacterial killing, suggesting defects related to chronic wood smoke inhalation limited to specific innate immune functions.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: QW Microbiology and Immunology > Immunity by Type > QW 541 Natural immunity. Immunogenetics
QW Microbiology and Immunology > Immune Responses > QW 700 Infection. Mechanisms of infection and resistance.
WA Public Health > Air pollution > WA 754 Pollution and pollutants (incl. tobacco pollution; passive smoking)
WC Communicable Diseases > Infection. Bacterial Infections > Bacterial Infections > WC 210 Streptococcal infections (General or not elsewhere classified)
WF Respiratory System > Tuberculosis > WF 200 Tuberculosis (General)
Faculty: Department: Clinical Sciences & International Health > Clinical Sciences Department
Digital Object Identifer (DOI): https://doi.org/10.1165/rcmb.2014-0188OC
Depositing User: Lynn Roberts-Maloney
Date Deposited: 29 Jan 2015 09:28
Last Modified: 07 Oct 2019 08:24
URI: https://archive.lstmed.ac.uk/id/eprint/4806

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