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Individual and contextual socioeconomic determinants of knowledge of the ABC approach of preventing the sexual transmission of HIV in Nigeria: a multilevel analysis

Uthman, Olalekan A., Kayode, Gbenga A. and Adekanmbi, Victor.T. (2013) 'Individual and contextual socioeconomic determinants of knowledge of the ABC approach of preventing the sexual transmission of HIV in Nigeria: a multilevel analysis'. Sexual Health, Vol 10, Issue 6, p. 522.

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Abstract

Background: Nigeria has the highest number of people living with HIV/AIDS in the world after India and South Africa. HIV/AIDS places a considerable burden on society’s resources, and its prevention is a cost-beneficial solution to address these consequences. To the best of our knowledge, there has been no multilevel study performed to date that examined the separate and independent associations of individual and community socioeconomic status (SES) with HIV prevention knowledge in Nigeria.

Methods: Multilevel linear regression models were applied to the 2008 Nigeria Demographic and Health Survey on 48 871 respondents (Level 1) nested within 886 communities (Level 2) from 37 districts (Level 3).

Results: Approximately one-fifth (20%) of respondents were not aware of any of the Abstinence, Being faithful and Condom use (ABC) approach of preventing the sexual transmission of HIV. However, the likelihood of being aware of the ABC approach of preventing the sexual transmission of HIV increased with older age, male gender, greater education attainment, a higher wealth index, living in an urban area and being from least socioeconomically disadvantaged communities. There were significant community and district variations in respondents’ knowledge of the ABC approach of preventing the sexual transmission of HIV.

Conclusion: The present study provides evidence that both individual- and community-level SES factors are important predictors of knowledge of the ABC approach of preventing the sexual transmission of HIV in Nigeria. The findings underscore the need to implement public health prevention strategies not only at the individual level, but also at the community level.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: WA Public Health > WA 30 Socioeconomic factors in public health (General)
WC Communicable Diseases > Sexually Transmitted Diseases > WC 140 Sexually transmitted diseases
WC Communicable Diseases > Virus Diseases > Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome. HIV Infections > WC 503 Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. HIV infections
WC Communicable Diseases > Virus Diseases > Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome. HIV Infections > WC 503.4 Epidemiology
Faculty: Department: Clinical Sciences & International Health > Clinical Sciences Department
Digital Object Identifer (DOI): https://doi.org/10.1071/sh13065
Depositing User: Martin Chapman
Date Deposited: 12 Feb 2015 16:19
Last Modified: 06 Feb 2018 13:08
URI: http://archive.lstmed.ac.uk/id/eprint/4906

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