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Household Transmission of Rotavirus in a Community with Rotavirus Vaccination in Quininde, Ecuador

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Lopman, Ben, Vicuña, Yosselin, Salazar, Fabian, Broncano, Nely, Esona, Matthew D., Sandoval, Carlos, Gregoricus, Nicole, Bowen, Michael D., Payne, Daniel, Vaca, Martiza, Chico, Martha, Parashar, Umesh and Cooper, Philip (2013) 'Household Transmission of Rotavirus in a Community with Rotavirus Vaccination in Quininde, Ecuador'. PLoS ONE, Vol 8, Issue 7, e67763.

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Abstract

Background

We studied the transmission of rotavirus infection in households in peri-urban Ecuador in the vaccination era.

Methods

Stool samples were collected from household contacts of child rotavirus cases, diarrhea controls and healthy controls following presentation of the index child to health facilities. Rotavirus infection status of contacts was determined by RT-qPCR. We examined factors associated with transmissibility (index-case characteristics) and susceptibility (household-contact characteristics).

Results

Amongst cases, diarrhea controls and healthy control household contacts, infection attack rates (iAR) were 55%, 8% and 2%, (n = 137, 130, 137) respectively. iARs were higher from index cases with vomiting, and amongst siblings. Disease ARs were higher when the index child was <18 months and had vomiting, with household contact <10 years and those sharing a room with the index case being more susceptible. We found no evidence of asymptomatic infections leading to disease transmission.

Conclusion

Transmission rates of rotavirus are high in households with an infected child, while background infections are rare. We have identified factors associated with transmission (vomiting/young age of index case) and susceptibility (young age/sharing a room/being a sibling of the index case). Vaccination may lead to indirect benefits by averting episodes or reducing symptoms in vaccinees.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: WA Public Health > Preventive Medicine > WA 110 Prevention and control of communicable diseases. Transmission of infectious diseases
WA Public Health > Preventive Medicine > WA 115 Immunization
WA Public Health > WA 30 Socioeconomic factors in public health (General)
WC Communicable Diseases > Virus Diseases > General RNA Virus Infections > WC 501 RNA virus infections (General or not elsewhere classified)
WS Pediatrics > Diseases of Children and Adolescents > By System > WS 312 Diarrheal disorders
Faculty: Department: Biological Sciences > Department of Tropical Disease Biology
Digital Object Identifer (DOI): https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0067763
Depositing User: Lynn Roberts-Maloney
Date Deposited: 26 Feb 2015 11:37
Last Modified: 06 Feb 2018 13:09
URI: https://archive.lstmed.ac.uk/id/eprint/4961

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