LSTM Home > LSTM Research > LSTM Online Archive

Rapid evolution of pyrethroid resistance prevalence in Anopheles gambiae populations from the cities of Douala and Yaoundé (Cameroon)

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year

Nkondjio, Christophe, Tene Fossog, Billy, Kopya, Edmond, Poumachu, Yacouba, Menze, Benjamin D., Ndo, Cyrille, Tchuinkam, Timoléon, Awono-Ambene, Parfait and Wondji, Charles ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-0791-3673 (2015) 'Rapid evolution of pyrethroid resistance prevalence in Anopheles gambiae populations from the cities of Douala and Yaoundé (Cameroon)'. Malaria Journal, Vol 14, e155.

[img]
Preview
Text
Malaria_J_14_155.pdf - Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.

Download (1MB)

Abstract

Background

The adaptation of malaria vectors to urban areas is becoming a serious challenge for malaria control. The study presents the evolution of pyrethroid resistance in mosquito populations from the cities of Douala and Yaoundé between 2010 and 2013.

Methods

Susceptibility tests to permethrin and deltamethrin were carried out with two- to four-day old unfed Anopheles gambiae sensu lato adults raised from larvae collected from the field. Mosquitoes resistant to permethrin and deltamethrin and control were screened to detect the presence of the kdr alleles using the TaqMan assays. Mosquitoes belonging to the An. gambiae complex were subjected to PCR assays designed for species and molecular forms identifications. The genomic region containing the upstream of intron-1 of the voltage-gated sodium channel was sequenced and compared between mosquitoes originating from different breeding habitats.

Results

Anopheles gambiae s.l. specimens collected from the city of Douala were all Anopheles coluzzii. In Yaoundé, both An. gambiae and An. coluzzii were recorded. A rapid decrease of mosquito mortality to permethrin and deltamethrin was recorded between 2010 and 2013 in the two cities. The mortality rate varied from 80.3 to 22.3% and 94.4 to 59.7% for permethrin and deltamethrin, respectively. Both kdr alleles L1014F and L1014S were recorded. The frequency of kdr alleles increased rapidly over the study period, varying from 44 to 88.9% in Yaoundé and from 68 to 81% in Douala. The sequencing of a 1,228 bp region of intro-1 of the voltage-gated sodium channel revealed the presence of five different haplotypes. A high number of these haplotypes were recorded in An. coluzzii samples. No evidence for a recent selective sweep on intron-1 sequence within samples originating from different breeding habitat was detected using Fu’s and Tajima Fs statistics.

Conclusion

The present study supports rapid evolution of pyrethroid resistance in vector populations from the cities of Douala and Yaoundé and calls for immediate action to fight against the increasing prevalence of pyrethroid-resistant mosquitoes.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: The electronic version of this article is the complete one and can be found online at: http://www.malariajournal.com/content/14/1/155
Subjects: QX Parasitology > Insects. Other Parasites > QX 515 Anopheles
QX Parasitology > Insects. Other Parasites > QX 600 Insect control. Tick control
WA Public Health > Preventive Medicine > WA 110 Prevention and control of communicable diseases. Transmission of infectious diseases
WA Public Health > Preventive Medicine > WA 240 Disinfection. Disinfestation. Pesticides (including diseases caused by)
WC Communicable Diseases > Tropical and Parasitic Diseases > WC 750 Malaria
Faculty: Department: Biological Sciences > Vector Biology Department
Digital Object Identifer (DOI): https://doi.org/10.1186/s12936-015-0675-6
Depositing User: Carmel Bates
Date Deposited: 18 May 2015 10:51
Last Modified: 06 Feb 2018 13:09
URI: https://archive.lstmed.ac.uk/id/eprint/5162

Statistics

View details

Actions (login required)

Edit Item Edit Item