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Serum Mannose-Binding Lectin Concentration, but Not Genotype, Is Associated With Clostridium difficile Infection Recurrence: A Prospective Cohort Study

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Swale, A., Miyajima, F., Kolamunnage-Dona, R., Roberts, P., Little, M., Beeching, Nicholas ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-7019-8791, Beadsworth, M. B. J., Liloglou, T. and Pirmohamed, M. (2014) 'Serum Mannose-Binding Lectin Concentration, but Not Genotype, Is Associated With Clostridium difficile Infection Recurrence: A Prospective Cohort Study'. Clinical Infectious Diseases, Vol 59, Issue 10, pp. 1429-1436.

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Abstract

Background

Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) plays a key role in the activation of the lectin-complement pathway of innate immunity, and its deficiency has been linked with several acute infections. However, its role in predisposing to, or modulating disease severity in, Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) has not been investigated.

Methods

We prospectively recruited 308 CDI case patients and 145 control patients with antibiotic-associated diarrhea (AAD). CDI outcome measures were disease severity, duration of symptoms, 30-day mortality, and 90-day recurrence. Serum concentrations of MBL were determined using a commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay transferred to an electrochemiluminescence–based platform. MBL2 polymorphisms were typed using a combination of pyrosequencing and TaqMan genotyping assays.

Results

The frequency of the MBL2 genetic variants was similar to that reported in other white populations. MBL serum concentrations in CDI and AAD subjects were determined by MBL2 exonic variants B, C, and D and the haplotypes (LYPB, LYQC, and HYPD). There was no difference in either MBL concentrations or genotypes between cases and controls. MBL concentration, but not genotype, was a determinant of CDI recurrence (odds ratios, 3.18 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 1.40–7.24] and 2.61 [95% CI, 1.35–5.04] at the <50 ng/mL and <100 ng/mL cutoff points, respectively; P < .001). However, neither MBL concentration nor MBL2 genotype was linked with the other CDI outcomes.

Conclusions

Serum MBL concentration did not differentiate between CDI cases and AAD controls, but among CDI cases, MBL concentration, but not genotype, was associated with CDI recurrence, indicating that MBL acts as a modulator of disease, rather than a predisposing factor.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: QU Biochemistry > Genetics > QU 500 Genetic phenomena
QW Microbiology and Immunology > Immunity by Type > QW 541 Natural immunity. Immunogenetics
QW Microbiology and Immunology > Immune Responses > QW 640 Agglutination. Precipitation
WC Communicable Diseases > Infection. Bacterial Infections > Other Bacterial Infections. Zoonotic Bacterial Infections > WC 368 Clostridium infections
WH Hemic and Lymphatic Systems > Hematologic Diseases. Immunologic Factors. Blood Banks > WH 400 Fluid elements. Plasma. Serum. Blood proteins. Blood protein disorders
Faculty: Department: Clinical Sciences & International Health > Clinical Sciences Department
Digital Object Identifer (DOI): https://doi.org/10.1093/cid/ciu666
Depositing User: Lynn Roberts-Maloney
Date Deposited: 29 May 2015 09:10
Last Modified: 15 Jun 2018 14:45
URI: http://archive.lstmed.ac.uk/id/eprint/5168

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