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Urinary antibiotic activity in paediatric patients attending an outpatient department in north-western Cambodia

Emary, Katherine R. W., Carter, Michael J., Pol, Sreymom, Sona, Soeng, Kumar, Varun, Day, Nicholas P. J., Parry, Christopher and Moore, Catrin E. (2015) 'Urinary antibiotic activity in paediatric patients attending an outpatient department in north-western Cambodia'. Tropical Medicine & International Health, Vol 20, Issue 1, pp. 24-28.

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Abstract

Objective

Antibiotic resistance is a prominent public and global health concern. We investigated antibiotic use in children by determining the proportion of unselected children with antibacterial activity in their urine attending a paediatric outpatient department in Siem Reap, Cambodia.

Methods

Caregiver reports of medication history and presence of possible infection symptoms were collected in addition to urine samples. Urine antibiotic activity was estimated by exposing bacteria to urine specimens, including assessment against multiresistant bacteria previously isolated from patients in the hospital (a methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), a multiresistant Salmonella typhi and an extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli isolate).

Results

Medication information and urine were collected from 775 children. Caregivers reported medication use in 69.0% of children in the preceding 48 h. 31.7% samples showed antibacterial activity; 16.3% showed activity against a local multiresistant organism. No specimens demonstrated activity against an ESBL-producing E. coli.

Conclusions

Antibiotics are widely used in the community setting in Cambodia. Parents are often ill-informed about drugs given to treat their children. Increasing the regulation and training of private pharmacies in Cambodia may be necessary. Regional surveillance of antibiotic use and resistance is also essential in devising preventive strategies against further development of antibiotic resistance, which would have both local and global consequences.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: QW Microbiology and Immunology > QW 45 Microbial drug resistance. General or not elsewhere classified.
WA Public Health > Health Problems of Special Population Groups > WA 395 Health in developing countries
WB Practice of Medicine > Therapeutics > WB 330 Drug therapy
WS Pediatrics > Diseases of Children and Adolescents > By System > WS 320 Urogenital system
Faculty: Department: Clinical Sciences & International Health > Clinical Sciences Department
Digital Object Identifer (DOI): https://doi.org/10.1111/tmi.12398
Depositing User: Lynn Roberts-Maloney
Date Deposited: 01 Jun 2015 09:36
Last Modified: 06 Feb 2018 13:10
URI: http://archive.lstmed.ac.uk/id/eprint/5180

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