LSTM Home > LSTM Research > LSTM Online Archive

Coherence between health policy and human resource strategy: lessons from maternal health in Vietnam, India and China

Martineau, Tim, Mirzoev, T., Pearson, S., Ha, B. T. T., Xu, Q., Ramani, K. V. and Liu, X. (2015) 'Coherence between health policy and human resource strategy: lessons from maternal health in Vietnam, India and China'. Health Policy and Planning, Vol 30, Issue 1, pp. 111-120.

Full text not available from this repository.

Abstract

The failure to meet health goals such as the Millennium Development Goals (MDG) is partly due to the lack of appropriate resources for the effective implementation of health policies. The lack of coherence between the health policies and human resource (HR) strategy is one of the major causes. This article explores the relationship and the degree of coherence between health policy—in this case maternal health policy—processes and HR strategy in Vietnam, China and India in the period 2005–09. Four maternal health policy case studies were explored [skilled birth attendance (SBA), adolescent and sexual reproductive health, domestic violence and medical termination of pregnancy] across three countries through interviews with key respondents, document analysis and stakeholder meetings. Analysis for coherence between health policy and HR strategy was informed by a typology covering ‘separation’, ‘fit’ and ‘dialogue’. Regarding coherence we found examples of complete separation between health policy and HR strategy, a good fit with the SBA policy though modified through ‘dialogue’ in Vietnam, and in one case a good fit between policy and strategy was developed through successive evaluations. Three key influences on coherence between health policy and HR strategy emerge from our findings: (1) health as the lead sector, (2) the nature of the policy instrument and (3) the presence of ‘HR champions’. Finally, we present a simple algorithm to ensure that appropriate HR related actors are involved; HR is considered at the policy development stage with the option of modifying the policy if it cannot be adequately supported by the available health workforce; and ensuring that HR strategies are monitored to ensure continued coherence with the health policy. This approach will ensure that the health workforce contributes more effectively to meeting the MDGs and future health goals.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: W General Medicine. Health Professions > Health Services. Patients and Patient Advocacy > W 84 Health services. Delivery of health care
WA Public Health > WA 30 Socioeconomic factors in public health (General)
WA Public Health > Health Problems of Special Population Groups > WA 310 Maternal welfare
WA Public Health > Health Administration and Organization > WA 540 National and state health administration
Faculty: Department: Clinical Sciences & International Health > International Public Health Department
Digital Object Identifer (DOI): https://doi.org/10.1093/heapol/czt102
Depositing User: Lynn Roberts-Maloney
Date Deposited: 22 Jun 2015 09:05
Last Modified: 06 Feb 2018 13:10
URI: https://archive.lstmed.ac.uk/id/eprint/5218

Statistics

View details

Actions (login required)

Edit Item Edit Item