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Clostridium difficile Toxin in Adult Inpatients in an Urban Hospital in Malawi: Associations with HIV Status, CD4 Count and Diarrhoea

Beadsworth, Michael, Keeley, Alex J., Roberts, Paul, Faragher, Brian, Watson, Alastair and Beeching, Nicholas ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-7019-8791 (2014) 'Clostridium difficile Toxin in Adult Inpatients in an Urban Hospital in Malawi: Associations with HIV Status, CD4 Count and Diarrhoea'. International Journal of Tropical Medicine, Vol 9, Issue 1, pp. 7-9.

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Abstract

Clostridium difficile Infection (CDI) is the cause of substantial morbidity and mortality in the developed world. However, very little is known about the burden of CDI in sub-Saharan Africa where less antibiotic restriction, high HIV prevalence and greater impact from nosocomial infection mean the potential for a significant disease burden is great. Researchers investigated the prevalence of Clostridium difficile Toxin (CDT), assessing association with HIV, CD4 count and diarrhoea in medical in-patients in Malawi. In 206 patients tested for CDT, 28 (13.6%) were positive. No significant associations were seen with either diarrhoea or HIV. There was a non-statistically significant (p = 0.056) association between CD4 counts of <50 and CDT. The frequency and the clinical implications of CDI in both HIV positive and negative patients in sub-Saharan Africa, requires further assessment.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: WA Public Health > Health Problems of Special Population Groups > WA 395 Health in developing countries
WC Communicable Diseases > Infection. Bacterial Infections > Other Bacterial Infections. Zoonotic Bacterial Infections > WC 368 Clostridium infections
WC Communicable Diseases > Virus Diseases > Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome. HIV Infections > WC 503 Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. HIV infections
WI Digestive System > WI 407 Diarrhea
Faculty: Department: Clinical Sciences & International Health > Clinical Sciences Department
Depositing User: Lynn Roberts-Maloney
Date Deposited: 22 Jun 2015 09:21
Last Modified: 06 Feb 2018 13:10
URI: http://archive.lstmed.ac.uk/id/eprint/5219

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