LSTM Home > LSTM Research > LSTM Online Archive

Differential Plasmodium falciparum surface antigen expression among children with Malarial Retinopathy

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year

Abdi, Abdirahman I, Kariuki, Symon M, Muthui, Michelle K, Kivisi, Cheryl A, Gregory, Fegan, Gitau, Evelyn, Charles R, Newton and Peter C, Bull (2015) 'Differential Plasmodium falciparum surface antigen expression among children with Malarial Retinopathy'. Scientific Reports, Vol 5, Issue 18034.

[img] Text
Sci_Rep_5_Differential Plasmodium falciparum surface antigen expression.pdf - Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.

Download (1MB)

Abstract

Retinopathy provides a window into the underlying pathology of life-threatening malarial coma (“cerebral malaria”), allowing differentiation between 1) coma caused by sequestration of Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes in the brain and 2) coma with other underlying causes. Parasite sequestration in the brain is mediated by PfEMP1; a diverse parasite antigen that is inserted into the surface of infected erythrocytes and adheres to various host receptors. PfEMP1 sub-groups called “DC8” and “DC13” have been proposed to cause brain pathology through interactions with endothelial protein C receptor. To test this we profiled PfEMP1 gene expression in parasites from children with clinically defined cerebral malaria, who either had or did not have accompanying retinopathy. We found no evidence for an elevation of DC8 or DC13 PfEMP1 expression in children with retinopathy. However, the proportional expression of a broad subgroup of PfEMP1 called “group A” was elevated in retinopathy patients suggesting that these variants may play a role in the pathology of cerebral malaria. Interventions targeting group A PfEMP1 may be effective at reducing brain pathology.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: QW Microbiology and Immunology > Antigens and Antibodies. Toxins and Antitoxins > QW 573 Antigens
QX Parasitology > Protozoa > QX 135 Plasmodia
WA Public Health > Health Problems of Special Population Groups > WA 320 Child Welfare. Child Health Services.
WC Communicable Diseases > Tropical and Parasitic Diseases > WC 695 Parasitic diseases (General)
WC Communicable Diseases > Tropical and Parasitic Diseases > WC 750 Malaria
Faculty: Department: Biological Sciences > Department of Tropical Disease Biology
Digital Object Identifer (DOI): https://doi.org/10.1038/srep18034
Depositing User: Jessica Jones
Date Deposited: 04 Jan 2016 10:27
Last Modified: 06 Feb 2018 13:11
URI: http://archive.lstmed.ac.uk/id/eprint/5460

Statistics

View details

Actions (login required)

Edit Item Edit Item