LSTM Home > LSTM Research > LSTM Online Archive

HIV-exposed uninfected infants show robust memory B cell responses in spite of a delayed accumulation of memory B cells: An observational study in the first two years of life.

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year

Nduati, Eunice W, Nkumama, Irene N, Gambo, Faith K, Mueuma, Daniel M, Knight, Miguel G, Hassan, Amin S, Jahangir, Margaret N, Etyang, Timothy J, Berkley, James A and Urban, Britta ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-4197-8393 (2016) 'HIV-exposed uninfected infants show robust memory B cell responses in spite of a delayed accumulation of memory B cells: An observational study in the first two years of life.'. Clinical and Vaccine Immunology, Vol 23, Issue 7.

[img]
Preview
Text
Clin_Vacc_Immunol_HIV-exposed uninfected infants show robust memory B cell respones.pdf - Accepted Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial.

Download (707kB) | Preview
[img]
Preview
Text
Clin_Vacc_Immunol_23_7_HIV-exposed uninfected infants show robust memory B cell respones.pdf - Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial.

Download (729kB) | Preview

Abstract

Background
Improved HIV care has led to an increase in the number of HIV-exposed uninfected (HEU) infants born to HIV infected women. Although uninfected, these infants experience increased morbidity and mortality. One explanation may be that their developing immune system is altered by HIV-exposure predisposing them to increased post-natal infections.

Methods
We explored the impact of HIV-exposure on the B-cell compartment by determining the B-cell subset distribution, the frequency of common vaccine antigen-specific memory B cells (MBCs) and their respective antibody levels in HEU and HIV-unexposed uninfected (HUU) infants born to uninfected mothers, using flow cytometry, B-cell ELISPOT and ELISA, respectively, during the first two years of life.

Results
For the majority of the B-cell subsets there were no differences between HEU and HUU infants. However, HIV exposure was associated with a lower proportion of B cells in general and specifically MBCs, largely due to a lower proportion of unswitched memory B cells. This reduction was maintained even after correcting for age. These phenotypic differences in the MBC compartment did not affect the ability of HEU infants to generate recall responses to previously encountered antigens, or reduce the antigen-specific antibody levels at 18 months of life.

Conclusions
Although HIV-exposure was associated with a transient reduction in the proportion of MBCs, we found that the ability of HEUs to mount robust MBC and serological responses was unaffected.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: QW Microbiology and Immunology > Reference Works. General Immunology > QW 504 General works
WC Communicable Diseases > Virus Diseases > Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome. HIV Infections > WC 503 Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. HIV infections
WH Hemic and Lymphatic Systems > Hematologic Diseases. Immunologic Factors. Blood Banks > WH 200 Leukocytes. Leukocyte disorders (General)
WS Pediatrics > By Age Groups > WS 430 Infancy
Faculty: Department: Biological Sciences > Department of Tropical Disease Biology
Digital Object Identifer (DOI): https://doi.org/10.1128/CVI.00149-16
Depositing User: Jessica Jones
Date Deposited: 20 May 2016 11:16
Last Modified: 06 Feb 2018 13:12
URI: http://archive.lstmed.ac.uk/id/eprint/5893

Statistics

View details

Actions (login required)

Edit Item Edit Item