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Challenges and opportunities associated with the introduction of next generation long lasting insecticidal nets for malaria control: a case study from Burkina Faso.

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Tesfazghi, Kemi, Traore, Adama, Ranson, Hilary ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-2332-8247, Sagnon, N'Fale, Hill, Jenny ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-1588-485X and Worrall, Eve ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-9147-3388 (2016) 'Challenges and opportunities associated with the introduction of next generation long lasting insecticidal nets for malaria control: a case study from Burkina Faso.'. Implementation Science, Vol 11, Issue 103.

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Abstract

BACKGROUND
Reductions in malaria incidence in Africa can largely be attributed to increases in malaria vector control activities; predominately the use of long lasting insecticidal nets (LLINs). With insecticide resistance affecting an increasing number of malaria endemic countries and threatening the effectiveness of conventional LLINs, there is an increasing urgency to implement alternative tools that control these resistant populations. The aim of this study was to identify potential challenges and opportunities for accelerating access to next generation LLINs in Burkina Faso, a country with areas of high levels of insecticide resistance.

METHODS
An analytical framework was used to guide the selection of interviewees, data collection and analysis. Semi structured interviews were carried out with key informants in April 2014 in Burkina Faso. Interviews were conducted in French and English, audio recorded, transcribed and entered into NVivo10 for data management and analysis. Data were coded according to the framework themes and then analysed to provide a description of the key points and explain patterns in the data.

RESULTS
Interviewees reported that the policy architecture in Burkina Faso is characterised by a strong framework of actors that contribute to policymaking and strong national research capacity which indirectly contributes to national policy change via collaboration with internationally led research. Financing significantly impacts the potential adoption, availability and affordability of next generation LLINs. This confers significant power on international donors that fund vector control. National decisions around which LLINs to procure were restricted to quantity and delivery dates; the potential to tackle insecticide resistance was not part of the decision-making process. Furthermore, at the time of the study there was no World Health Organisation (WHO) guidance on where and when next generation LLINs might positively impact on malaria transmission, severely limiting their adoption, availability and affordability.

CONCLUSIONS
This study shows that access to next generation LLINs was severely compromised by the lack of global guidance. In a country like Burkina Faso where WHO recommendations are relatively quickly adopted, a clear WHO recommendation and adequate financing will be key to accelerate access to next generation LLINs.

Key Words: Malaria, Next generation long lasting insecticidal nets, LLINs, PBO nets, Policy Analysis, Vector Control, Burkina Faso.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: WA Public Health > Preventive Medicine > WA 240 Disinfection. Disinfestation. Pesticides (including diseases caused by)
WA Public Health > Health Administration and Organization > WA 540 National and state health administration
WC Communicable Diseases > Tropical and Parasitic Diseases > WC 750 Malaria
WC Communicable Diseases > Tropical and Parasitic Diseases > WC 765 Prevention and control
Faculty: Department: Clinical Sciences & International Health > Clinical Sciences Department
Biological Sciences > Vector Biology Department
Digital Object Identifer (DOI): https://doi.org/10.1186/s13012-016-0469-4
Depositing User: Carmel Bates
Date Deposited: 13 Jul 2016 11:12
Last Modified: 06 Feb 2018 13:12
URI: http://archive.lstmed.ac.uk/id/eprint/5984

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