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Utilisation of Maternal Health Services by Adolescent Mothers in Kenya: Analysis of the Demographic Health Survey 2008 - 2009

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Banke-Thomas, Oluwasola, Banke-Thomas, Aduragbemi and Ameh, Charles ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-2341-7605 (2018) 'Utilisation of Maternal Health Services by Adolescent Mothers in Kenya: Analysis of the Demographic Health Survey 2008 - 2009'. International Journal of Adolescent Medicine and Health, Vol 30, Issue 2, e20160042.

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Abstract

Background
Many Kenyan adolescents die following pregnancy and childbirth complications. Maternal health services (MHS) utilisation is key to averting such poor outcomes. Our objectives were to understand the characteristics of adolescent mothers in Kenya, describe their MHS utilisation pattern and explore factors that influence this pattern.

Methods
We collected demographic and MHS utilisation data of all 301 adolescent mothers aged 15–19 years included in the Kenya Demographic Health Survey 2008/2009. Descriptive statistics were used to characterise them and their MHS utilisation patterns. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were used to test associations between selected predictor variables and MHS utilisation.

Findings
86%, 48% and 86% of adolescent mothers used ante-natal care (ANC), skilled birth attendance (SBA) and postnatal care (PNC) respectively. Adolescent mothers from the richest quintile were nine (CI=2.00-81.24,p=0.001) and seven (CI=3.22-16.22,p<0.001) times more likely to use ANC and SBA respectively compared to those from the poorest. Those with primary education were four (CI=1.68-9.64,p<0.001) and two (CI=0.97-4.81,p=0.043) times more likely to receive ANC and SBA respectively compared to uneducated mothers, with similar significant findings amongst their partners. Urban adolescent mothers were six (CI=1.89-32.45,p=0.001) and four (CI=2.00-6.20,p<0.001) times more likely to use ANC and SBA respectively compared to their rural counterparts. Odds of Maasai adolescent mothers using ANC was 90% (CI=0.02-0.93,p=0.010) lower than Kalenjin mothers.

Conclusions
Adolescent MHS utilisation in Kenya is an inequality issue. In addressing this, focus should be placed on the poorest, least educated, rural dwelling adolescent mothers living in the most disadvantaged communities.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: W General Medicine. Health Professions > Health Services. Patients and Patient Advocacy > W 85 Patients. Attitude and compliance
W General Medicine. Health Professions > W 21.5 Allied health personnel. Allied health professions
WA Public Health > WA 30 Socioeconomic factors in public health (General)
WA Public Health > Health Problems of Special Population Groups > WA 310 Maternal welfare
WA Public Health > Statistics. Surveys > WA 950 Theory or methods of medical statistics. Epidemiologic methods
WQ Obstetrics > Childbirth. Prenatal Care > WQ 175 Prenatal care
WS Pediatrics > By Age Groups > WS 460 Adolescence (General)
Faculty: Department: Clinical Sciences & International Health > International Public Health Department
Digital Object Identifer (DOI): https://doi.org/10.1515/ijamh-2016-0042
Depositing User: Caroline Hercod
Date Deposited: 12 Sep 2016 11:16
Last Modified: 10 May 2018 15:34
URI: http://archive.lstmed.ac.uk/id/eprint/6073

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