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An extensive burden of giardiasis associated with intestinal schistosomiasis and anaemia in school children on the shoreline of Lake Albert, Uganda

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Alshehri, Hajri, Stanton, Michelle ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-1754-4894, LaCourse, James ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-9261-7136, Atuhaire, Aaron, Arinaitwe, Moses, Wamboko, Aida, Adriko, Moses, Kabatereine, Narcis B and Stothard, Russell ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-9370-3420 (2016) 'An extensive burden of giardiasis associated with intestinal schistosomiasis and anaemia in school children on the shoreline of Lake Albert, Uganda'. Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, Vol 110, Issue 10, pp. 597-603.

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Abstract

Background
Water-borne parasitic diseases associated with poverty still blight the lives of African school children. In Uganda, intestinal schistosomiasis is still common along the shoreline of Lake Albert, despite ongoing control, and co-infection with giardiasis and malaria is poorly described. To shed light on putative interactions between diseases, a prospective cross-sectional parasitological survey was undertaken in five primary schools.

Methods
Stool samples from 254 school children, aged 5–10 years, were examined by microscopy and rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs), with additional real-time PCR assays for detection of Giardia DNA. A finger-prick blood sample was also taken from each child and tested for malaria, and haemoblobin levels measured. Assocations between diseases and anaemia were assessed.

Results
Intestinal schistosomiasis (46.5%), giardiasis (41.6%) and malaria (56.2%) were common, and a quarter of children were anaemic (<115 g/L). Up to 87.0% of children were excreting Giardia DNA and the prevalence of heavy infection by real-time PCR (Ct≤19) was 19.5%, being positively associated with light, moderate and heavy egg-patent schistosomiasis, as well as with anaemia.

Conclusions
In this setting, an extensive burden of giardiasis was revealed with heavy intensity infections associated with egg-patent intestinal schistosomiasis and anaemia. To improve child health, greater attention on giardiasis is needed along with exploring joined-up actions across diseases that promote better water hygiene and sanitation measures.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: WC Communicable Diseases > Tropical and Parasitic Diseases > WC 700 Protozoan infections (General)
WC Communicable Diseases > Tropical and Parasitic Diseases > WC 750 Malaria
WC Communicable Diseases > Tropical and Parasitic Diseases > WC 810 Schistosomiasis
WH Hemic and Lymphatic Systems > Hematologic Diseases. Immunologic Factors. Blood Banks > WH 155 Anemia
WS Pediatrics > Diseases of Children and Adolescents > By System > WS 310 Digestive system
WS Pediatrics > By Age Groups > WS 460 Adolescence (General)
Faculty: Department: Biological Sciences > Department of Tropical Disease Biology
Digital Object Identifer (DOI): https://doi.org/10.1093/trstmh/trw072
Depositing User: Jessica Jones
Date Deposited: 24 Nov 2016 12:56
Last Modified: 02 Dec 2019 12:53
URI: https://archive.lstmed.ac.uk/id/eprint/6392

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