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Community-Acquired Pneumonia in Sub-Saharan Africa

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Aston, R J and Rylance, Jamie ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-2323-3611 (2016) 'Community-Acquired Pneumonia in Sub-Saharan Africa'. Seminars in Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, Vol 37, Issue 6, pp. 855-867.

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Abstract

Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in sub-Saharan Africa is a common cause of adult hospitalization and is associated with significant mortality. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) prevalence in the region leads to differences in CAP epidemiology compared with most high-income settings: patients are younger, and coinfection with tuberculosis and opportunistic infections is common and difficult to diagnose. Resource limitations affect the availability of medical expertise as well as radiological and laboratory diagnostic services. These factors impact on key aspects of health care, including pathways of investigation, severity assessment, and the selection of empirical antimicrobial therapy. This review summarizes recent data from sub-Saharan Africa describing the burden, etiology, risk factors, and outcome of CAP. We describe the rational and context-appropriate approach to CAP diagnosis and management, including supportive therapy. Priorities for future research to inform strategies for CAP prevention and initial management are suggested.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: WA Public Health > WA 100 General works
WA Public Health > WA 20.5 Research (General)
WA Public Health > Health Problems of Special Population Groups > WA 395 Health in developing countries
WC Communicable Diseases > Infection. Bacterial Infections > Bacterial Infections > WC 202 Pneumonia (General or not elsewhere classified)
WC Communicable Diseases > Virus Diseases > Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome. HIV Infections > WC 503 Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. HIV infections
WF Respiratory System > Tuberculosis > WF 200 Tuberculosis (General)
Faculty: Department: Clinical Sciences & International Health > Clinical Sciences Department
Clinical Sciences & International Health > International Public Health Department
Digital Object Identifer (DOI): https://doi.org/10.1055/s-0036-1592126
Depositing User: Stacy Murtagh
Date Deposited: 17 Jan 2017 14:27
Last Modified: 13 Dec 2017 02:02
URI: https://archive.lstmed.ac.uk/id/eprint/6738

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