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Economic costs and health-related quality of life outcomes of HIV treatment following self- and facility-based HIV testing in a cluster randomised trial

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Lalloo, David ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-7680-2200, Maheswaran, Hendramoorthy, Petrou, Stavros, MacPherson, Peter ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-0329-9613, Kumwenda, Felistas, Corbett, Elizabeth and Clarke, Aileen (2017) 'Economic costs and health-related quality of life outcomes of HIV treatment following self- and facility-based HIV testing in a cluster randomised trial'. JAIDS: Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes, Vol 75, Issue 3, pp. 280-289.

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Abstract

Background
HIV self-testing (HIVST) is recommended in Africa, but little is known about how this approach influences economic outcomes following subsequent antiretroviral treatment (ART) compared to facility-based HIV testing and counselling (HTC).

Methods
HIV-positive participants attending HIV clinics, diagnosed by HIVST or facility-based HTC as part of a community cluster-randomised trial (ISRCTN02004005), were followed from initial assessment for ART until one-year postinitiation. Healthcare resource use was measured, and costing studies estimated total health provider costs. Participants were interviewed to establish direct non-medical and indirect costs over the first-year of ART. Costs were adjusted to 2014 US$ and INT$. Health-related quality of life was measured using EuroQol EQ-5D. Multivariable analyses estimated predictors of economic outcomes.

Results
Of 325 participants attending HIV clinics for assessment for ART, 265 were identified through facility-based HTC, and 60 through HIVST; 168/265 (69.2%) and 36/60 (60.0%), respectively, initiated ART. Mean total health provider assessment costs for ART initiation were US$22.79 (SE:0.56) and US$19.92 (SE:0.77) for facilitybased HTC and HIVST participants, respectively, and was US$2.87 (bootstrap95%CI:US$1.01,US$4.73) lower for the HIVST group. Mean health provider costs for first-year of ART were US$168.65 (SE:2.02) and US$164.66 (SE:4.21) for facility-based HTC and HIVST participants, respectively, and were comparable (bootstrap95%CI:-US$12.38,US$4.39). EQ-5D utility scores were comparable between the two groups, and one-year after ART initiation had increased by 0.129 (SE:0.011) and 0.139 (SE:0.027) for facility-based HTC and HIVST participants, respectively.

Conclusions
Once HIV self-testers are linked into HIV services, their economic outcomes are comparable to those linking to services after facility-based HTC.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: WA Public Health > WA 30 Socioeconomic factors in public health (General)
WC Communicable Diseases > Virus Diseases > Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome. HIV Infections > WC 503 Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. HIV infections
WC Communicable Diseases > Virus Diseases > Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome. HIV Infections > WC 503.1 Diagnosis
WC Communicable Diseases > Virus Diseases > Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome. HIV Infections > WC 503.7 Psychosocial aspects
Faculty: Department: Clinical Sciences & International Health > Clinical Sciences Department
Clinical Sciences & International Health > International Public Health Department
Digital Object Identifer (DOI): https://doi.org/10.1097/QAI.0000000000001373
Depositing User: Annmarie Hand
Date Deposited: 13 Apr 2017 12:23
Last Modified: 21 Mar 2018 02:02
URI: https://archive.lstmed.ac.uk/id/eprint/6936

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