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Developing global indicators for quality of maternal and newborn care: a feasibility assessment

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Madaj, Barbara ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-4073-3191, Smith, Helen ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-6252-3793, Mathai, Matthews ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-7352-9330, Roos, Nathalie and van den Broek, Nynke ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-8523-2684 (2017) 'Developing global indicators for quality of maternal and newborn care: a feasibility assessment'. Bulletin of the World Health Organization, Vol 95, Issue 6, pp. 445-452.

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Abstract

Objective
To assess the feasibility of applying the World Health Organization’s proposed 15 indicators of quality of care for maternal and
newborn health at health-facility level in low- and middle-income settings.
Methods
Six of the indicators are about maternal health, five are for newborn health and four are general cross-cutting indicators. We
used data collected routinely in facility registers and obtained as part of facility assessments from 963 health-care facilities specializing in
maternity services in 10 countries in Africa and Asia. We made a feasibility assessment of the availability of data and the clarity of indicator
definitions and identified additional information and data collection processes needed to apply the proposed indicators in real-life settings.
Findings
Of the indicators evaluated, 10 were clearly defined, of which four could be applied directly in the field and six would require
revisions to operationalize them. The other five indicators require further development, with one of them being ready for implementation
by using information readily available in registers and four requiring further information before deployment. For indicators that measure
coverage of care or availability of services or products, there is a need to further strengthen measurement. Information on emergency
obstetric complications was not recorded in a standard manner, thus limiting the reliability of the information.
Conclusion
While some of the proposed indicators can already be applied, other indicators need to be refined or will need additional
sources and methods of data collection to be applied in real-world settings.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: W General Medicine. Health Professions > Health Services. Patients and Patient Advocacy > W 84.4 Quality of Health Care
WA Public Health > WA 30 Socioeconomic factors in public health (General)
WA Public Health > Health Problems of Special Population Groups > WA 310 Maternal welfare
WQ Obstetrics > WQ 100 General works
WQ Obstetrics > Childbirth. Prenatal Care > WQ 160 Midwifery
WQ Obstetrics > Childbirth. Prenatal Care > WQ 175 Prenatal care
WQ Obstetrics > WQ 20 Research (General)
WQ Obstetrics > Pregnancy > WQ 200 General works
WS Pediatrics > By Age Groups > WS 420 Newborn infants. Neonatology
Faculty: Department: Clinical Sciences & International Health > International Public Health Department
Digital Object Identifer (DOI): https://doi.org/10.2471/BLT.16.179531
Depositing User: Stacy Murtagh
Date Deposited: 07 Jun 2017 09:41
Last Modified: 17 Oct 2017 15:24
URI: http://archive.lstmed.ac.uk/id/eprint/7189

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