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Hypertension in treated and untreated HIV infected patients - a study from 2011 to 2013 at the Jos University Teaching Hospital, Nigeria

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Isa, Samson E., Kang-ombe, Arthur, Simji, Gomerep S, Shehu, Nathan Y, Oche, Agbaji O, Idoko, John A, Cuevas, Luis ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-6581-0587 and Gill, Geoff (2017) 'Hypertension in treated and untreated HIV infected patients - a study from 2011 to 2013 at the Jos University Teaching Hospital, Nigeria'. Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, Vol 111, Issue 4, pp. 172-177.

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Abstract

Background: HIV infected individuals, especially those on antiretroviral therapy (ART), may have increased risk of hypertension. We investigated the prevalence of hypertension at enrolment and 12 months after commencing ART in a Nigerian HIV clinic.

Methods: Data from patients enrolled for ART from 2011 to 2013 was analysed, including 2310 patients at enrolment and 1524 re-evaluated after 12 months of ART. The presence of hypertension, demographic, clinical and biochemical data were retrieved from standardized databases. Bivariate and logistic regressions were used to identify baseline risk factors for hypertension.

Results: Prevalence of hypertension at enrolment was 19.3% (95%CI: 17.6% – 20.9%), and age (p<0.001), male sex (p=0.004) and body mass index (BMI) (p<0.001) were independent risk factors for hypertension. Twelve months after initiating ART, a further 31% (95%CI: 17.6% – 20.9%) had developed hypertension. Total prevalence at that point in time was 50.2%. Hypertension among those on ART was associated with age (p=0.009) and BMI (p=0.008), but not with sex. There were no independently significant associations between hypertension and CD4+ counts, viral load or type of ART.

Conclusions: Hypertension is common in HIV infected individuals attending the HIV clinic. Patients initiating ART have a high risk of developing hypertension in the first year of ART. Since BMI is modifiable, life-style advice aimed at weight reduction is strongly advisable.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: This is a pre-copyedited, author-produced version of an article accepted for publication in Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene following peer review. The version of recordSamson E. Isa, Arthur R. Kang'ombe, Gomerep S. Simji, Nathan Y. Shehu, Agbaji O. Oche, John A. Idoko, Luis E. Cuevas, Geoffrey V. Gill; Hypertension in treated and untreated patients with HIV: a study from 2011 to 2013 at the Jos University Teaching Hospital, Nigeria. Trans R Soc Trop Med Hyg 2017; 111 (4): 172-177. is available online at: https://doi.org/10.1093/trstmh/trx030
Subjects: WC Communicable Diseases > Virus Diseases > Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome. HIV Infections > WC 503 Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. HIV infections
WC Communicable Diseases > Virus Diseases > Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome. HIV Infections > WC 503.5 Complications
WG Cardiovascular System > WG 100 General works
Faculty: Department: Clinical Sciences & International Health > Clinical Sciences Department
Digital Object Identifer (DOI): https://doi.org/10.1093/trstmh/trx030
Depositing User: Julie Franco
Date Deposited: 12 Jul 2017 10:59
Last Modified: 28 Jun 2018 01:02
URI: https://archive.lstmed.ac.uk/id/eprint/7267

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