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High burden of Schistosoma mansoni infection in school-aged children in Marolambo District, Madagascar

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Spencer, Stephen A, Penney, James M. St. John, Russell, Hannah J., Howe, Anthony P., Linder, Cortland, Rakotomampianina, Andriamahitsisambatra L. D., Nandimbiniaina,, Anjara M., Squire, Bertie ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-7173-9038, Stothard, Russell ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-9370-3420 and Bustinduy, Amaya L. (2017) 'High burden of Schistosoma mansoni infection in school-aged children in Marolambo District, Madagascar'. Parasites & Vectors, Vol 10, Issue 307.

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Abstract

Background
A school-based survey was undertaken to assess prevalence and infection intensity of schistosomiasis in school-aged children in the Marolambo District of Madagascar.

Methods
School-aged children from six purposively selected schools were tested for Schistosoma haematobium by urine filtration and Schistosoma mansoni using circulating cathodic antigen (CCA) and Kato-Katz stool analysis. The investigators did not address soil-transmitted helminths (STH) in this study.

Results
Of 399 school-aged children screened, 93.7% were infected with S. mansoni based on CCA analysis. Kato-Katz analysis of stool revealed S. mansoni infection in 73.6% (215/ 292). Heavy infections (> 400 eggs per gram) were common (32.1%; 69/ 215), with a mean of 482 eggs per gram of stool. Moderate infection intensities were detected in 31.2% (67/ 215) and light infection intensities in 36.7% (79/ 215) of infected participants. No infection with S. haematobium was detected by urine filtration.

Conclusions
Intestinal schistosomiasis appears a considerable public health issue in this remote area of Madagascar where there is a pressing need for mass drug administration.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: WA Public Health > Health Problems of Special Population Groups > WA 320 Child Welfare. Child Health Services.
WA Public Health > Health Problems of Special Population Groups > WA 395 Health in developing countries
WC Communicable Diseases > Tropical and Parasitic Diseases > WC 810 Schistosomiasis
WS Pediatrics > WS 100 General works
Faculty: Department: Clinical Sciences & International Health > Clinical Sciences Department
Biological Sciences > Department of Tropical Disease Biology
Digital Object Identifer (DOI): https://doi.org/10.1186/s13071-017-2249-7
Depositing User: Stacy Murtagh
Date Deposited: 05 Jul 2017 15:06
Last Modified: 06 Feb 2018 13:15
URI: http://archive.lstmed.ac.uk/id/eprint/7336

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