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Using a smartphone-based self-management platform to support medication adherence and clinical consultation in Parkinson's disease.

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Lakshminarayana, Rashmi, Wang, Duolao ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-2788-2464, Burn, David, Chaudhuri, K Ray, Galtrey, Clare, Guzman, Natalie Valle, Hellman, Bruce, Ben James, -, Pal, Suvankar, Stamford, Jon, Steiger, Malcolm, Stott, R W, Teo, James, Barker, Roger A, Wang, Emma, Bloem, Bastiaan R, van der Eijk, Martijn, Rochester, Lynn and Williams, Adrian (2017) 'Using a smartphone-based self-management platform to support medication adherence and clinical consultation in Parkinson's disease.'. NPJ Parkinson's disease, Vol 3, e2.

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Abstract

The progressive nature of Parkinson's disease, its complex treatment regimens and the high rates of comorbid conditions make self-management and treatment adherence a challenge. Clinicians have limited face-to-face consultation time with Parkinson's disease patients, making it difficult to comprehensively address non-adherence. Here we share the results from a multi-centre (seven centres) randomised controlled trial conducted in England and Scotland to assess the impact of using a smartphone-based Parkinson's tracker app to promote patient self-management, enhance treatment adherence and quality of clinical consultation. Eligible Parkinson's disease patients were randomised using a 1:1 ratio according to a computer-generated random sequence, stratified by centre and using blocks of variable size, to intervention Parkinson's Tracker App or control (Treatment as Usual). Primary outcome was the self-reported score of adherence to treatment (Morisky medication adherence scale -8) at 16 weeks. Secondary outcomes were Quality of Life (Parkinson's disease questionnaire -39), quality of consultation for Parkinson's disease patients (Patient-centred questionnaire for Parkinson's disease), impact on non-motor symptoms (Non-motor symptoms questionnaire), depression and anxiety (Hospital anxiety and depression scale) and beliefs about medication (Beliefs about Medication Questionnaire) at 16 weeks. Primary and secondary endpoints were analysed using a generalised linear model with treatment as the fixed effect and baseline measurement as the covariate. 158 patients completed the study (Parkinson's tracker app = 68 and TAU = 90). At 16 weeks Parkinson's tracker app significantly improved adherence, compared to treatment as usual (mean difference: 0.39, 95%CI 0.04-0.74; p = 0.0304) with no confounding effects of gender, number of comorbidities and age. Among secondary outcomes, Parkinson's tracker app significantly improved patients' perception of quality of consultation (0.15, 95% CI 0.03 to 0.27; p = 0.0110). The change in non-motor symptoms was -0.82 (95% CI -1.75 to 0.10; p = 0.0822). 72% of participants in the Parkinson's tracker app group continued to use and engage with the application throughout the 16-week trial period. The Parkinson's tracker app can be an effective and novel way of enhancing self-reported medication adherence and quality of clinical consultation by supporting self-management in Parkinson's disease in patients owning smartphones. Further work is recommended to determine whether the benefits of the intervention are maintained beyond the 16 week study period.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: W General Medicine. Health Professions > Health Services. Patients and Patient Advocacy > W 85 Patients. Attitude and compliance
W General Medicine. Health Professions > W 83 Telemedicine (General)
W General Medicine. Health Professions > Health Services. Patients and Patient Advocacy > W 84 Health services. Delivery of health care
WL Nervous System > WL 300 General works (Include works on brain alone)
Faculty: Department: Clinical Sciences & International Health > Clinical Sciences Department
Digital Object Identifer (DOI): https://doi.org/10.1038/s41531-016-0003-z
SWORD Depositor: JISC Pubrouter
Depositing User: JISC Pubrouter
Date Deposited: 19 Jul 2017 14:30
Last Modified: 10 Jan 2018 11:01
URI: http://archive.lstmed.ac.uk/id/eprint/7345

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