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Factors influencing implementation of interventions to promote birth preparedness and complication readiness.

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Solnes Miltenburg, Andrea, Roggeveen, Yadira, van Roosmalen, Jos and Smith, Helen ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-6252-3793 (2017) 'Factors influencing implementation of interventions to promote birth preparedness and complication readiness.'. BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, Vol 17, Issue 1, e270.

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Abstract

The recent WHO report on health promotion interventions for maternal and newborn health recommends birth preparedness and complications readiness interventions to increase the use of skilled care at birth and to increase timely use of facility care for obstetric and newborn complications. However, these interventions are complex and relate strongly to the context in which they are implemented. In this article we explore factors to consider when implementing these interventions. This paper reports a secondary analysis of 64 studies on birth preparedness and complication readiness interventions identified through a systematic review and updated searches. Analysis was performed using the Supporting the Use of Research Evidence (SURE) framework to guide thematic analysis of barriers and facilitators for implementation. Differences in definitions, indicators and evaluation strategies of birth preparedness and complication readiness interventions complicate the analysis. Although most studies focus on women as the main target group, multi-stakeholder participation with interventions occurring simultaneously at both community and facility level facilitated the impact on seeking skilled care at birth. Increase in formal education for women most likely contributed positively to results. Women and their families adhering to traditional beliefs, (human) resource scarcities, financial constraints of women and families and mismatches between offered and desired maternity care services were identified as key barriers for implementation. Implementation of birth preparedness and complication readiness to improve the use of skilled care at birth can be facilitated by contextualizing interventions through multi-stakeholder involvement, targeting interventions at multiple levels of the health system and ensuring interventions and program messages are consistent with local knowledge and practices and the capabilities of the health system.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: WA Public Health > WA 30 Socioeconomic factors in public health (General)
WA Public Health > Health Problems of Special Population Groups > WA 310 Maternal welfare
WQ Obstetrics > Childbirth. Prenatal Care > WQ 152 Natural childbirth
WQ Obstetrics > Childbirth. Prenatal Care > WQ 155 Home childbirth
WQ Obstetrics > Pregnancy Complications > WQ 240 Pregnancy complications (General)
WQ Obstetrics > Labor > WQ 300 General works
Faculty: Department: Clinical Sciences & International Health > International Public Health Department
Digital Object Identifer (DOI): https://doi.org/10.1186/s12884-017-1448-8
SWORD Depositor: JISC Pubrouter
Depositing User: JISC Pubrouter
Date Deposited: 29 Sep 2017 13:45
Last Modified: 29 Sep 2017 13:45
URI: https://archive.lstmed.ac.uk/id/eprint/7583

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