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Airflow Obstruction and Use of Solid Fuels for Cooking or Heating: BOLD Results

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Amaral, André F. S., Patel, Jaymini, Kato, Bernet S, Obaseki, Daniel O, Lawin, Hervé, Tan, Wan C, Juvekar, Sanjay K, Harrabi, Imed, Studnicka, Michael, Wouters, Emiel F.M., Loh, Li-Cher, Bateman, Eric D., Mortimer, Kevin ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-8118-8871, Buist, A. Sonia and Burney, Peter G.J. (2018) 'Airflow Obstruction and Use of Solid Fuels for Cooking or Heating: BOLD Results'. American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, Vol 197, Issue 5, pp. 595-610.

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Abstract

Rationale:
Evidence supporting the association of COPD or airflow obstruction with use of solid fuels is conflicting and inconsistent.

Objective:
To assess the association of airflow obstruction with self-reported use of solid fuels for cooking or heating.

Methods:
We analysed 18,554 adults from the BOLD study, who had provided acceptable post-bronchodilator spirometry measurements and information on use of solid fuels. The association of airflow obstruction with use of solid fuels for cooking or heating was assessed by sex, within each site, using regression analysis. Estimates were stratified by national income and meta-analysed. We carried out similar analyses for spirometric restriction, chronic cough and chronic phlegm.

Measurements and main results:
We found no association between airflow obstruction and use of solid fuels for cooking or heating (ORmen=1.20, 95%CI 0.94-1.53; ORwomen=0.88, 95%CI 0.67-1.15). This was true for low/middle and high income sites. Among never smokers there was also no evidence of an association of airflow obstruction with use of solid fuels (ORmen=1.00, 95%CI 0.57-1.76; ORwomen=1.00, 95%CI 0.76-1.32). Overall, we found no association of spirometric restriction, chronic cough or chronic phlegm with the use of solid fuels. However, we found that chronic phlegm was more likely to be reported among female never smokers and those who had been exposed for ≥20 years.

Conclusion:
Airflow obstruction assessed from post-bronchodilator spirometry was not associated with use of solid fuels for cooking or heating.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: WA Public Health > Health Problems of Special Population Groups > WA 395 Health in developing countries
WA Public Health > Air pollution > WA 754 Pollution and pollutants (incl. tobacco pollution; passive smoking)
WA Public Health > Housing. Buildings. Public Facilities > WA 795 Housing
WF Respiratory System > WF 20 Research (General)
WF Respiratory System > Lungs > WF 600 Lungs
Faculty: Department: Clinical Sciences & International Health > Clinical Sciences Department
Digital Object Identifer (DOI): https://doi.org/10.1164/rccm.201701-0205oc
SWORD Depositor: JISC Pubrouter
Depositing User: Stacy Murtagh
Date Deposited: 27 Sep 2017 09:44
Last Modified: 15 Feb 2019 15:09
URI: https://archive.lstmed.ac.uk/id/eprint/7615

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